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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC UfflMfiXn 



3 1833 01801 3794 



GENEALOGY 
975.602 
G85UNA 
1920 





KNOWLEDGE 



3EMSON) 

PRINTING COMPANY 




ORDER OF BOOKS 
? 

Book One 

THE COLLEGE 

Book Two 

THE CLASSES 

Book Three 

ORGANIZATIONS 

Book Four 

ATHLETICS 

Book Five 

THE COLLEGE YEAR 

Book Six 

PUBLICATIONS 
HUMOR 



FOREWORD 



=■— - r==g g5f ■ -■ — = 

Some serious thought and 
much real fun have gone into 
the work of preparing this 
hook. We realize that it yet 
has to go through the perils of 
censorship, and not on ac- 
count of it, hut in spite of it, 
we now launch it on the Sea 
of Public Opinion. We hope 
that it may withstand all 
adverse criticism, and anchor 
safely in the Harbor of Your 
Favor. And may this Echo 
re-echo through the years 
which may come and awaken 
in you memories of the hap- 
py days spent at G. C. W. 









DEDICATION 

to 

JENNIE THORNLEY CLARKE 

In recognition of the highest 
ideals of character she has 
set before us throughout our 
college life, and in apprecia- 
tion of the personal interest 
she has taken in the life of 
each of us as a student — 
just, untiring, sympathetic, 
an example of noble Chris- 
tian womanhood, we, the 
Class of 1920, lovingly dedi- 
cate this, our volume of 

T he Echo 




MISS JENNIE THORNLEY CLARKE 



(5) 






RESPONSE TO DEDICATION 

A group of maidens, young and fair, 

Through winter s cold and summer s glow 

Have wrought with me in earnest care, 
That flower ana fruit in time might grow. 

Ana when the harvest feast was planned 
They plucked a blossom from their store 

And laid it in my loving hand. 
My heart will keep it evermore. 




Ijp (Bolton? 



BOOK I 



Historical Sketch 




REENSBORO COLLEGE for Women, located at Greensboro, N. C, 
has a history reaching far back into the period of ante-bellum life. It 
was chartered in 1 838 as Greensboro Female College and is the second 
oldest chartered institution for women in the South. The corner stone 
of the first building was not laid until 1843, and it was not until 1846 
that the school opened its doors for students. The first President was the Rev. Solomon 
Lea, who was rated as a capable and well-equipped teacher, and he was assisted by 
an able faculty. At once the College drew to its halls many students from the far 
Southern States. 

Dr. Lea was succeeded in the presidency by Dr. A. M. Shipp, a man whose record 
as an educator is written high in the years of his service. He administered the affairs of 
the college for three years, after which he resigned to accept a professorship in the 
University of North Carolina. His successor was Dr. Charles F. Deems, afterwards 
widely known as the pastor of the Church of the Strangers, in New York City. Under 
the presidency of Dr. Deems the College enjoyed an era of great prosperity. The fourth 
President of the College, the successor of Dr. Deems, was Dr. T. M. Jones, whose memory 
hundreds of noble women afterwards rose up to call blessed. During the presidency of 
Dr. Jones, the main building of the College was destroyed by fire. This calamity, joined 
with the misfortunes brought by war, necessitated the closing of the school for a period 
of ten years. The corner stone of a new building was laid in 1871 ; and in August, 1 873, 
the school again opened its doors for the reception of students. Dr. Jones continued at 
the head of the institution until his death, in 1 890, greatly lamented by the church and 
the constituency he had served so well. Dr. B. F. Dixon was his successor. His pres- 
idency extended over a period of three years, when he was succeeded by Dr. Frank L. 
Reid, who was, at the time of his election, editor of The Raleigh Christian Advocate. 
He had fairly begun what promised to be a great and successful experience in the dis- 
charge of his duties when he was suddenly called from his earthly activities by the messenger 
of death. Dr. Dred Peacock, who had been a useful member of the faculty, was elected 
to the presidency on the death of Dr. Reid. On account of ill health, Dr. Peacock 
resigned his post in 1902, when Mrs. Lucy H. Robertson was selected as his successor. 
She had been for a number of years connected with the school as a member of its faculty, 
and the success which attended her administration was no surprise. 

Between 1 902 and 1 904 untoward conditions came upon the College. First, its 
Board of Trustees was greatly discouraged on account of stringent financial conditions 
and decided to put the property in process of liquidation. Later the main building of 
the College was destroyed by fire. The end of the institution now seemed to have come ; 
but, through the almost superhuman efforts of the alumnae and the co-operation of the 
Annual Conferences, a new and splendid building was erected in 1 904, and the school 
opened with the largest registration of students known in its history. Since then its pros- 
perity has continued. During the year 1906-07 the attendance reached high-water 

(9) 



OS 



mark, and the same conditions have continued down to the year 1 920. A new dormitory 
was erected in 1912, known as Fitzgerald Hall. The building was named in honor of 
Mr. J. W. Fitzgerald, of Linwood, who gave $10,000 towards its erection. This 
building was filled to its capacity as soon as it was opened to students. In the year 
1913, Mrs. Robertson having resigned, Rev. S. B. Turrentine, D. D., a member of the 
Western North Carolina Conference, was elected President. Since his election, a new 
dormitory has been built and was opened in the fall of 1917. This building is named 
Hudson Hall in memory of Mrs. Mary Lee Hudson, Shelby, N. C, whose donations 
to the College amount to more than $12,000. A new building for the conservatory of 
music will soon be erected as the gift of Mr. J. A. Odell, of Greensboro. 







(10) 


















We believe in being rather than seeming; in the devotion to 
high ideals; in daring to do our duty as we understand it. 

We believe in having an attentive eye, a listening ear, a busy 
brain, in keeping the mind clear and bright, filling it with whole- 
some thoughts of life; in losing ourselves in useful industry. 

We believe in being worthy at all times; in having grim 
energy and resolute courage for the conquest of fear; in gaining 
confidence in our own ability. 

We believe in service, in doing kind deeds, thinking kind 
thoughts; in being strong, gentle, pure, and good, steady, loyal 
and enduring. 

We believe in reverence for truth; in humility; in great as- 
pirations and high ambitions; in toiling ever upward. 

We believe in cultivating the bright virtue of patriotism, and 
the holy passion of friendship. 

We believe in studying hard, thinking quietly, talking gently, 
acting frankly; in listening to the winds, the trees, the stars and 
the birds, to babes and sages with open hearts ; we believe in being 
glad, in loving all, in hating none, in doing all bravely, bearing all 
cheerfully, awaiting occasions, hurrying never. 

We believe in striving to gain sound knowledge, not content 
simply to know, but determined to use knowledge for the highest 
purpose. 

We believe in Man and Woman, in God's unending love, 
and in the Future. 



College Songs 



College Song 

Words and music by Mrs. A. K. Moore, nee Miss Blanche Dawson, Class '09 

To our dear old Alma Mater we will sing a song of praise, 
All our hearts are filled with loyalty and love; 
For to her belongs all praise and honor 
That our tongues can frame, 

And for her we raise our hearts in praise above. 
Through the shade and through the sunshine 
She has stood, our college home. 
May she stand for countless ages yet to be; 
. Ah, our hearts beat high with pride and rapture 
For the home we love, 
As we sing a song for dear old G. C. 

Chorus 
Dear G. C., thy name is thrilling in the air, 
Dear G. C., my own dear college home so fair, 
Bright dreams of young life's golden spring 
Around thy walls forever cling. 

As years advance and life puts on an aspect more severe, 

With faith in G. C. old and ever new, 

Whose precepts and who3e dignity 

We look to and revere, success and fame 

Shall crown our efforts true. 

The high ideals and truth 

That she has taught us to regard 

Illumination to our way shall be. 

In mem'ry dear we'll hold her through 

The long, long years to come, 

Our faithful Alma Mater, dear G. C. 

Alma Mater 

Words by L. B. Hurley. Music by B. S. Bates 

Thou who gave us dreams unnumbered. Thou whose fame shall live forever, 

Thou who gave us life unknown, Noblest champion of the truth, 

Thou who waked us as we slumbered, Naught from thee our hearts can sever- 

Took us wholly as thine own ; Guide and guardian of our youth. 

Thou who gave us cherished memories, Still the harmony is ringing 

Friendship's fire to bless each day, Over valley, hill and plain, 

Claimed us as thine own dear children, Loyal children still are singing, 

To thee our debt we thus would pay. Singing forth the glad refrain. 

Chorus 
Fairest, fairest Alma Mater, 

Long our song shall rise to thee, 
As we pledge our deep devotion, 

Thy name shall ring from sea to sea. 

(12) 




DR. S. B. TURRENTINE, D.D.. President 



Former Presidents of Greensboro College for Women 

1838-1913 



Dr. Solomon Lea 
Dr. A. M. Shipp 



Dr. Charles F. Deems 
Dr. T. M Jones 
Dr. B. F. Dixon 
Dr. Frank L. Reid 



Dr. Dred Peacock 

Mrs. Lucy H. Robertson 



(13) 







Dir5]|c==3!fa1[ ^^ rD 



Faculty 



METTIE E . RlCKETTS 

Dean of Women and Professor of French 

Graduate Wesleyan Institute, Staunton, Va. ; Res- 
ident Student in Paris and Berlin; Graduate 
Courses at Columbia University. 










Mrs. Lucy H. Robertson 

President Emerita and Professor of Religious 
Education 

Misses Nash and Kollock's School. 




Rev. W. M. Curtis, Ph.B. 

Associate Professor of Bible; Secretary and 
Treasurer 

University of North Carolina; "Vanderbilt University. 



(14) 






Uiojic 













Faculty 










Annie McKinnie Pegram 

Professor of Mathematics and 

Science 

A.B., A.M., Trinity College; Grad- 
uate Courses at Columbia Uni- 
versity. 



Jennie Thornley Clarke 

Professor of History and Social 

Science 

A.M., Peabody College for Teach- 
ers; Diploma Sauveur School of 
Languages; Graduate Courses at 
University of Chicago and Har- 
vard University. 



David F. Nicholson 

Professor of Education and 

Science 

A.B., University of North Caro- 
lina; Post-Graduate Emory Col- 
lege; A.M. Harvard University. 



Leonard Burwell Hurley 
Professor of English 

A.B., A.M., Trinity College; Grad- 
uate Work University of Chicago. 






Elizabeth A. Weber 
Professor of Latin and Spanish 

A.B. and Bachelor's Diploma in 
Education, Teachers' College 
George Washington University; 
Graduate Work George Washing- 
ton University. 



Linnie Marie Ward 
Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Greensboro College for 
Women; Graduate Courses in Uni- 
versity of North Carolina and 
Peabody College for Teachers. 










(15) 



H(°J0 













Faculty 




Marguerite Tuthill 
Instructor in Chemistry 

A.B., Greensboro College for 
Women; Graduate Courses Colum- 
bia University. 



Conrad Lahser 
Professor of French and Theo- 
retical Branches of Music 

Royal Academy of Art, Hochschule 
fuer Musik, Berlin, Germany; 
A.M., Columbia University. 



Mortimer Browning 
Professor of Organ and Associ- 
ate Professor of Piano 

Graduate in Organ, Peabody Con- 
servatory of Music, Baltimore, Md. 



Benjamin S. Bates 
Professor of Voice 

New England Conservatory of 
Music, Normal Department; Pupil 
of Arthur J. Hubbard, Boston, 
Signor Dante Del Papa, Rome, 
Chas. B. Stevens, Boston, Herbert 
Witherspoon, New York, and Chi- 
cago Musical College. 






Robert L. Roy 

Professor of Violin and Stringed 

Instruments 

Royal Conservatory, Dresden; 
Concert Meister Gents, Berlin. 



> Agnes Hall Chasten 

Associate Professor of Piano and 

Theory of Music 

Graduate of New England Con- 
servatory of Music. 




(16) 









3011 




Faculty 





Viola Tucker 

Associate Professor of Piano and 

History of Music 

Graduate in Piano, Peabody Con- 
servatory, Baltimore. 



Dixie Robinson 

Professor of Expression and 

Physical Culture 

B.E., Columbia School of Expres- 
sion, Chicago; Courses in Vander- 
bilt University, University of Ten- 
nessee, and George Peabody Col- 
lege for Teachers. 



Ida M. Bridgman 

Professor of Harmony; Associate 

Professor of Piano 

Graduate New England Conserva- 
tory of Music. 



Thelma Harrell 

Instructor in Voice 

B.M., Greensboro College for 
Women. 



Ida G. Rees 

Professor of Household Economics 

Graduate College of Industrial 
Arts, Denton, Texas; A.B., Uni- 
versity of Texas. 



Mary L. Auld 

Professor of Bookkeeping and 

Stenography 

Graduate Lander College, S. C. ; 
Teacher's Certificate Phonographic 
Institute, Cincinnati, O., Boston, 
Mass. 






(17) 






(111= 



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Faculty 



Mrs. Reuben R. Alley 
Librarian 



E. J. Porter 

Professor of Art 

The Art Students' League of New 
York; Graduate New York School 
of Design; Graduate Courses in 
Art in New York City and Paris. 



Elizabeth C. Hamilton 

Supervisor of Buildings and 

Infirmary 



Bessie Barber 

Dietician and Supervisor of Kitchen 

and Dining Room 

Graduate Battle Creek School of 
Economics. 




OTHER OFFICERS AND ASSISTANTS 
Rev. Edwin L. Bain, D.D. Elizabeth Ferguson 

Chaplain Bookkeeper 

Ola Callahan 
Registrar 

Minnie B. Atwater 
College Chaperon 

Marguerite Tuthill 
Assistant in Library 



Rev. W. M Curtis 
Secretary and Treasurer 

Letha Brock 
Assistant in Mathematics and Registrar 



A.B., Greensboro College for Women; Graduate 
Courses in University of North Carolina. 



STUDENT ASSISTANTS 

Martha Adams 

Mary Louise Harrell 

Student Assistants in English 

Mary Francis Rankin 
Student Assistant in Art 

(18) 









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Main Hall 



'O'er more than half a century of years, 

Through Wars dread circumstance and tears, 

Have stood these ivy-wreathed old walls; 
Within young life has thronged the halls. 



(19) 





















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Main Entrance to Campus 



'To muse and brood and live again in Memory." 






(20) 



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Rotunda Entrance 



'Here the voices of the past, 
Linl(s of a broken chain." 









(21) 





































campus Scene 



"Here the stately softly-sighing pines 
Sift the shadows through their needles 
Down upon a winding walk- 
When the sun in dewy newness shines, 
Here wayside, wind-blown grasses 

To the wild flowers nod and talk " 



(22) 



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'O f/ie /oucfi of happy feet 

Underneath those grand old trees! 
O the blithe young voices sweet 

Borne upon the evening breeze!" 









(23) 






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Campus Scene 



'Here all the tumult of the market place, 
Here all the glamour of the crowded street, 

Where vain deception walks with haughty face, 
Is lost amid thy stillness." 









(24) 
















Campus Scene 



'Here Nature holds her carnival of peace, 
The very stillness of the lazy afternoon 

Is yet unbroken and the birds that cease 
Their singing will aTvafyen soon." 



(25) 












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Fitzgerald Hall 



'The oak, Token living, Monarch of the wood." 

"That totver of strength 
That stood four-square to all the teinds that blerv." 



(26) 












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Hudson Hall 






'Where the quiet-colored end of evening smiles 
Miles and miles." 



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(27) 

























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(28) 





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BOOK II 




PROF. L. B. HURLEY 

Honorary Member of Class of 1920 



Senior Class 

Motto: Per Ardua ad Astra 
Horeer : Aster 

Blanche Erwin President 

Louise Foy Vice-President Annie Griffin . . . 

Professor Leonard B. Hurley . Faculty Member 

(31) 



Officers 

Colors : Silver Grey and Royal Purple 
Animal: Jabberwock 
Martha Evelyn Morris .... Secretary 
Treasurer 













Senior Clas. 

*^ $-7S'30 

Martha Fitzgerald Adams, A.B Goldsboro, N. C. » 

Emerson Literary Fociety; Censor of B. L. S. (2); Nordica Club (2), (3), (4); Traveling , \ 

Glee Club (2). (3), (4); Vice-President Class (2); Annual Staff (2), (3), (4); String (XV 

Band (2), (3), (4); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3), (4); Critic of E. L. S. (3); Certificate in \ * / 

Domestic Science (3); Dramatic Club (3); President of Class (3); President of E. L. S. \ 
(4); Chief Marshal (4); President's Council (4); Student Assistant in English (3), (4). 

As a resident of the Gospel shanty, the handsomest gill in school, Martha is one of the most lovable, 
considerate, meditative, and invaluable students our Alma Mater has ever claimed. As for intellectual 
attainments, we refer to English themes; as to charms, to her innumerable admirers. Never has it been 
said more sincerely and appropriately, "To know her is to love her." 



(32) 










Clc 



>emor v^iass <tZ£&***4Jis /&& 

<?/^ &e^ o&l^ die,. 

Margaret Elizabeth Austin, A.B Salisbury, N. C. sL#6ul 

Irving Literary Society; Nordica Club (1), (2); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2), (4); Vice- 
President Class (3); Censor Irving Literary Society (4); Business Manager Echo (4); 
Order of the Nightingale (4). 

The jolly, teasing, never-to-be-forgotten, always ready, on-the-job Liz — who has a personality which 
not only has won Ads for herself, but for the Annual as well. Two sparkling blue eyes, the pinkest of 
cheeks, and the happiest of smiles. Isn't life noble? 



(33) 



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>emor ^.lass 



Myrtle Barnes, A.B Lumbe rton, N. C. 

Emerson Literary Society; President of Tribunal B. L. S. (4); Class Track (3), (4); 
"G" Club (4). 

"Myrt" is a bundle of natural humor and accommodations which are paralleled only by her jolly dispo- 
sition. You aren't surprised when you laugh at what she says, you are rather surprised if you don't 
lau^h. She is a good Biblical student of some characters such as Vashti. "Eat, drink, and be merry" 
is an old adage, but one which has in her life a daily application. 



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(34) 




Bessie Lois Buckner, A.B Salisbury, N. C 



Emerson Literary Society; Nordica Club (1), (2), (31, (4); Traveling Glee Club (2), (3), 
(4); Business Manager of Class (3); Second Vice-President of Students' Association (3); 
Treasurer of Y. W. C. A. (4); Certificate in Voice (4); President Order of the Night- 
ingale (4). 

Bess is the only Senior who can have her lessons read to her without asking that it be done. There is 
not a more dependable girl in the land and certainly few possess a sweeter voice. Capable, dependable, 
true as steel — what else need be said? 






(35) 



Dmuc 










Senior Class 






Elizabeth Athalia Cox, A.B Ri chlands , N. C. 

Emerson Literary Society; Dramatic Club (2); Corresponding Secretary E. L. Society (4). 

Did you say that Liz didn't have a date tonight? Mirable dictu! Few of us can excel her in that line. 
1 iz is a good sport, carefree as a bird, excitable, but always sensitive in the intellectual world to make 
a good record for her class. 

P. S. — Favorite musician, Harper. 



(36) 






77. £", Xkcj 
M£2£ k 




>enior 



'J?foMMC( Lily Cox, A.B. 



Jacksonville, N. C 



Emerson Literary Society; Quill Club (2), (3), (4); Secretary Quill Club (2); Message 
Staff (2), (3); Dramatic Club (2); Inter-Society Debate (2); Annual Staff (3); String- 
Band (3); Editor-in-Chief Handbook (3); Corresponding Secretary E. L. S. (3); Censor 
E. L. S. (4); Editor-in-Chief Annual (4); Class Prophet. 

Mary Lily is the most active resident on Senior Hall after lights, especially when the moon is up and 
Ineze and Martha aren't sleepy. Her quick and ready wit, her pep, her originality, her daring, her 
dreamy flights, surpassed only by her common sense and depth of thought, brand her as one of the 
"best eggs" in '20, and as the one possible hope for putting proud Jacksonville, N C, on the map. 






(37) 



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oenior Class 



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Louise Snow Davis, A.B Pemand 



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4^51^^ 




iina, 



living Literary Society; President of Class (1); Treasurer of Athletics (2); Vice-Pres- 
ident of Tribunal of I. L. S. (2); Assistant Business Manager of Class (3); President of 
I. L. S. (3); Secretary of Dramatic Club (2); Message Staff (4). 



Fl/ 



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As a typical representative of Southern aristocracy, a genuine embodiment of honest-to-goodness prac- 
ticability, affability and attractiveness, Lu has crept into the hearts and lives of her classmates and 
sisters. Flowers, club sandwiches, candy, specials, theatre bids — these are anything but the "Bain" of 
her existence. 



(38) 




vJ£^*^£«£*o 



>emor 



Nell Chester Davis, A.B Fernandina, Fl 



Irving Literary Society; Browning- Club (2), (3), (4); Class Track Team (1), (2), (3), 
(4); Class Tennis Team (1), (3), (4); "G" Club (4); Vice-House-President of Fitzgerald 
Hall (2); Secretary Class (3); Echo Staff (3); Critic I. L. S. (3); Secretary and Treas- 
urer Browning Club (3); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3); President's Council (4); President 
Student Government (4). 

Nell is the most model member of '20. In fact, she's the best all-round girl in school. As our Student 
President, she has won our love and admiration by fairness, calm and deliberate judgment, and poise. 
She s always ready on the athletic field and as for dates and music, we refer you to Miss Ricketts and 
Mr. Browning. Indeed, what better recommendations could we give "Nell-wants-to-get-marned-Davis "? 

(39) 



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ass 






Erdene Beatrice Denning, B.S Albemarle, N. C. 



Irving Literary Society; Vice-President of I. L.. S. Tribunal (4). 



Erdene is quiet to outsiders, but on Senior Hall she is one of the most mischievous and frolicsome girls 
we ever saw. Her most active occupation is rocking — but since it is only a rocking chair, we envy the 
easy hours she spends. But wait, she isn't lazy — she studies every lesson day by day and is one of the 
most competent girls of 1 '20. 




J. 3/lUlolK 



m 











Senior Class 






Louise Elliott, B.M Catawba, N. C. 

Emerson Literary Society; E. L. S. Marshal (1); Tribunal (2); Nordica Club (1), (2), (3), 
(4); Quill Club (2), (3), (4); Glee Club (2), (3), (4); Echo Staff (3), (4); Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet (3), (4); String Band (3), (4); Vice-President Y. W. C. A. (4); E. L. S. President 
Tribunal (3); Treasurer (4); Browning Club (4). 

Winsome, you say? Well, look at statistics! Louise is one of the few girls who is cordial and congenial 
with everyone, and who is happy and sympathetic in any situation. She is always ready for a joke and 
never afraid to handle a hard sonata. Can such a sunny, captivating girl exist and not be greatly 
loved and admired? 

(41) 







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Senior Class ^/^ 




Blanche Erwin, A.B Norwood 



Davidson College (1): Emerson Literary Society; Inter-Society Debate (2); Tribunal 
E. L. S. (3); Vice-President E. L. S. (4): Class Basketball (2), (3), (4); Basketball 
Champions (2), (3i; Class Track Team (2), (3); Vice-President Athletic Association 
(3); "G" Club (2), (3), (4); Fire Captain (3); Student Council (3); Message Staff (3); 
Nordica Club (2). (3), (4); Traveling Glee Club (2), (3). (4); Class President (4); 
President's Council (4). 

"A pair of eyes that speak of love 'n everything" — who says this isn't Blanche, the most attractive a-d 
captivating girl in school, the resolute and efficient President of the Seniors? She has a great affinity 
for the best things in College — new girls no exception! We drink to her. May others share her 
comradeship. 



(42) 




>enior 



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Louise Foy, A.B ; Mount Airy, N. C. 

Irving Literary Society; Class Track (2), (3), (4); Marshal I. L. S. (3); Champion 
Basketball Team (3); Class Basketball (4); Captain of Track (4); Vice-President Class 
(4); House President (4); Student Council (4); Annual Staff (4); "G" Club (3), (4). 

"Sh-h-h-h- the lights have winked" — that's our House-President's taps. She's about the most efficient 
official going, possibly because she goes to all the truth and fault meetings. Frank, did you say? After 
all, Lou is a good sport, a staunch friend, an apt student, an active athlete, argumentative to the last 
analysis — familiarly termed, "an old good 'un." 



(43) 
















Senior Class /3 36> 



Annie Etta Griffin, A.B Norfolk Va. 

Irving Literary Society; Dramatic Club (1), (2), (3), (4); Quill Club (1); Nordica Club 
(1), (2); Champion Relay Team (1), (2); Vice-President Dramatic Club (2); "G" Club 
(2), (3), (4); Track Team (3), (4); Captain Track Team (3); Class Treasurer (4); 
Secretary I. L. S. (4); President Dramatic Club (4); Certificate in Domestic Science; 
Diploma in Expression (4). 

Lovable, coquettish, athletic, dramatic Annie — a most valuable asset to every organization in school. 
We don t wonder at this when we consider the prominence of her predecessors in Manteo — -Sir Waller 
Raleigh, Blackboard, and Virginia Dare, for instance. Historic, we should say. 



(44) 



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Senior Class 



Mary Louise Harrell, A.B Gates, N. C. 



Irving Literary Society; House President Hudson (3); Student Council (3); Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet (3); Editor-in-Chief of Message (4); Class Basketball Team (3), (4); Class 
Treasurer (3); "G" Club (4); Nordica Club (2), (1), (3), (4); Traveling Glee Club 
(2), (3), (4); Business Manager Handbook (3); Certificate in Voice (4); Secretary Order 
of the Nightingale (4); Student Assistant in English (3), (4). 

"Ferme," "Mollie," "Mary Lu" — a score of names, a score of virtues. Frankness, sincerity, thorough- 
ness in scholarship — these are interwoven with a genuine good nature. Her voice is ever musical, a 
deep and rich contralto which we can never forget. 



(45) 






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Annie Harris, B.S Oriental, N. C. 



Emerson Literary Society; First Vice-President of Tribunal E. L. S. (4). 



H <?f7' 



Annie isn't the only daughter, but still she gets boxes and "specials" from home every Sunday. Inde- 
pendent, reserved, systematic, punctual, and highly efficient — these are qualities which will win a place 
for her in the world. 



(46) 




'97k, . 2.1 . A**< 



Senior Class 





0£*. 



Sallie Garrett Holt, B.M McLeansville, N. C. 

Emerson Literary Society; Class Track Team (1). 

We wonder why Sallie makes such frequent visits home, but we suppose, like Postum, "there's a reason." 
Composition is her hobby, practicing her daily exercise, while conscientiousness and dignity are her 
senior virtues. 



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(47) 







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7£ 



*~~~y}lsjisj Naomi Jeanne Howie, A.B Albemarle, N. C. 

Emerson Literary Society; Marshal E. L. S. (1); Class President (2); President S. S. 
Conference (2); Student Council (2), (4): Message Staff (2), (3); Secretary E. L. S. (3); 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3), (4); Class Track Team (3), (4); Champion Basketball Team 
(3); Basketball Team (4); Browning Club (2), (3), (4); Vice-President Browning Club 
(3); "G" Club (4); Quill Club (1), (2), (3), (4); Student Volunteer Band (3), 
(4); President Y. W. C. A. (4); President's Council (4); Class Poet. 

A poet, a lover, a missionary, all are attributes of our Y. W. President. We hate to think of losing 
her in some foreign field, yet we know her gentle manner, her sweet disposition, and innocent belief that 
"all's well that ends well," will endear her to her new friends and make her life count with them as it 
has counted with us. 

(48) 



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Mary Lucile Morris, A.B Ashebofo, N. 



Irving Literary Society; Class Track Team (1), (2); Captain Track (1), (2); Class 
Basketball Team (1), (2); Basketball Champion (2); "G" Club (1), (2), (3), (4); Student 
Council (4); Echo Staff (4); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3), (4); Glee Club (4); President 
Athletic Association (4); President's Council (4); Order of Nightingale (4). 

"Freshie" Morris, you're a wonder, 

And when you are old and gray 
We will all say "Yes, by thunder, 
You were some girl in your day." 

How many times have we yelled that to our Athletic President — the possessor of eight stars, loads of 
pep and a "questionable" (?) rep! Added to this, she's graceful, spirited, capricious, slightly sassy, 
and the greatest secret-keeper on the hill. 

(49) 



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Martha Evelyn Morris, B.M Asheboro, N. C. 

Irving Literary Society; Dramatic Club (2); Browning Club (2), (3), (4); String Band 
(3); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3), (4); President Browning Club (4); Class Secretary (4). 

Who said Mot didn't have a piano lesson today? Anyway, sweet aromas from a certain perfume 
bottle floated down the hall and a certain stack of music disappeared from the hall shelf. Musical, modest, 
dignified, innocent, merry-making — that's Mot. We wish we had a dozen more like her. 



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(50) 



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Senior Class ' '^ 3 £&<£l^ M*^ 

Nellie Kriebel Muse, B.S High Point, N. C. ^ 7^^>^- 

Brenau College (1); Irving Literary Society, Class Basketball Team (2), (4); Champion 
Basketball Team (2); Class Track Team (2); Class Tennis Team (2), (3), (4); String 
Band (2), (3), (4); Nordica Club (2), (3), (4); Traveling Glee Club (2), (3), (4); Dra- 
matic Club (2), (3), (4); "G" Club; Annual Staff (3), (4); Message Staff (4); President 
Dramatic Club (3); Critic Dramatic Club (4); President's Council; President Irving 
Literary Society (4); Class Testator. 

Delightfully delectable, never neglectable, greatly respectable, always "cosmeticable" — i. e., Nellie 

Krieble, the most striking girl in school, the shrew tamed at summer school. Rah! Rah! for our 

Shakespearean star. She has plenty of common sense, excellent tastes, and strong convictions — a girl 
well worth knowing, and liking. 

(51) 













Senior Class 

Carrie Louise McNeely, B.S 



uo S^?n ne-ir St. 

Lake Toxaway, N. C.^?^^ 






Emerson Literary Society; Nordica Club (1); Teacher's certificate in Household Eco- 
nomics (3); Message Staff (4). 

There isn't a soul on the campus or off the campus that Carrie can't mimic. In fact she possesses the 
most successful abundance of wit that we know of. Did you say "sassy"? Not at all! As for 
domestic inclinations, she can cook anything "deviled" or "angeled." Some man has luck in store for him. 



(52) 















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Bernice Hunter Nicholson, A.B Washington, N. C. **■ ' * °* 

Irving Literary Society; Nordica Club (1), (2), (3), (4) ; Traveling- Glee Club (2), (3), (4); 
String- Band (2), (3), (4); T. W. C. A. Cabinet (2); Student Council (3), (4); Second 
Vice-President of I. L. S. (2); President Tribunal I. L. S. (3); Chairman Point System 
(3); Corresponding Secretary Students' Association (3); Vice-President I. L. S. (4); 
Order of Nightingale (4). 

"Ber" is a bird when it comes to warbling and calling for fresh air. Otherwise, she is a linguist — an 
intellectual star, in short, the Minerva of '20. Her power of concentration is the envy of all of us, 
while her ability to make a hit reminds us that she is positively irresistible. 



(53) 







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May Robinson, B.S. 



M.^ftAiry, RC. 



Irving Literary Society; Treasurer of Class '(2); Captain Basketball Team (2); Class 
Basketball Team (2); Marshal I. L. S. (3); "G" Club (2), (3), (4); Tribunal (4). 

May carries the heaviest course in school, but her shoulders are broad enough to carry anything. Mag- 
nanimity is her star virtue, for her heart is the biggest thing on the campus. Frolicsome, buxom, cheerful, 
constant, kind — attributes of an inestimable friend — the Soph Basketball captain, "Chief" of Senior Hall. 



£733 



(54) 



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'Janets' 



Madge Temperance Sills, B.S Wmston-SalemrN. C. 



Irving Literary Society; Quill Club (1), (2), (3), (4); President Quill Club (2), (3); 
Message Staff (2), (3); Annual Staff (3), (4); Student Council (2), (3), (4); Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet (3), (4); Vice-President I. L. S. (3); President's Council (4); Undergraduate 
Field Representative of the Student Committee of the South Atlantic Field (4); Class 
Historian. 



0-70 4-2> 



The "personification of brains," exceedingly loyal, extremely enthusiastic whether it be a new idea, a 
student campaign, or a Freshman. Some folks wonder how Madge T. makes so many A's without 
burning the midnight oil, but we who know her best, realize that it is because she is a genuine scholar and 
the cleverest girl in school. May her life at Barnard be as illustrious as at G. C. and may she win the 
respect and love of as many of the faculty and students. 



(55) 




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Emerson Literary Society; Marshal E. L. S. (2); Class Track (1), (2), (3); Y. W. C.V 
Cabinet (3); String Band (3); Executive Council (3), (4); Secretary Student Council (37 
Censor E. L. S. (3); Secretary Student Government (3); Secretary E. L. S. (4); Cer- 
tificate in Domestic Science (3); Echo Staff (4); Vice-President Student Government (4). 



"As you 
pendence 



might say," Ineze is a saucy, "previous," piece of humanity, truly modified by tact, inde- 
sound and invaluable judgment. She is always ready to take a nap or go shopping and is 
never too busy to read a book or eat. Deeply dependable, ever aesthetic, truly domestic, "I" is one 
of the most indispensable members of '20. May her life be one of "brotherly" happiness. 






(56) 







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Senior Class 



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Ethel Voncanon, A.B. 



7X. 

. .West End, N. C. A 73 7£ 



Irving Literary Society; Quill Club (2), (3), (4); Message Staff (3), (4); Chaplain I. L. S. 
(3); Registrar (2), (3). 

Ethel has taken every English course offered and we don't overestimate the results when we say she is one 
of the best read girls in school. A dreamer, a literary aspirant — these characterize her most. She is 
conscientious and studious, a combination which has made her an excellent representative of '20. 



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Kate Warlick, A.B Newton, N. C. 

Emerson Literary Society; President Prep. Department (1); Champion Basketball Team 
(2), (4); Relay Team (2), (4); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3), (4); Annual Staff (3), (4); 
Message Staff (4); "G" Club (2), (3), (4); Tribunal E. L. S. (3); Marshal E. L. S. (3); 
E. L. S. Critic (4). 

We, have always wondered why Kate was so witty; now we know it's because of her "Cilley" inclina- 
tions'" Anyway, she is the wittiest girl on the campus and one of the most brilliant, facts that are 
impowered by her sound reason. Her resourcefulness, her vigor and her keen discriminating qualities, 
her simply won't-come-off smile, have won her a score of friends. 



(58) 







)enior 





Nellie White, A.B. 



Class //3~~^b . JA&i^n £". 

Wilkesboro, N. C. ' 



Irving Literary Society; Vice-House-President Hudson Hall (2); House President Hudson 
Hall (3); Member Student Council (3); Echo Staff (3); Chaplain I. L. S. (4); Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet (4). 



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Excellent in scholarship, faithful in duty, reserved in disposition, unaffected and kind in manner, this 
bespeaks Nellie to a T. We never have got her on a high horse and that's why we maintain she will 
always be level-headed in the greatest crisis. 



In 



(59) 







Senior Class . <?a o 










, n. c: 



MARY WlLSON, A.B Warren Plains 



Emerson Literary Society; Basketball Team (3); Viee-House-Presiclent (3); Dramatic 
Club (3), (4). 

Mary is one of the quietest and most pensive Seniors on the Hall, but like all still waters, she runs 
deep. It is no doubt her gentle iranner, her affable disposition, her will : ngness to serve that ha-\e 
prompted many a five-pound box of candy, and won for her a place within the hearts of her classmates. 



(60) 









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/*/^<j.. Mabel Young, A.B. 




ireensboro, 



Ii-ving Literary Society; Basketball Team (3), (4); Captain Basketball Team (3), (4); 
Wearer of "G" (3), (4); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4). 

Mabel is a domestic science student like her twin sister — differing only in her favorite method of 
cooking — "Fry "ing. When thinking of her, it is impossible to leave out her wonderful basketball record, 
management of the Y. W. store and frequent visits home. A faithful worker, a ready smile, and a 
friend in need! 



"t^ki-A-J^-., 






(61) 







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Class "77k* 



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Marie Young, A.B. . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Irving Literary Society; Dramatic Club (2); Echo Staff (4); Secretary Y. W. C. A. (4); 
Executive Cabinet of Y. W. C. A. (4). 

Who said logic and domestic science? Some combination! We don't wonder at such a course especially 
in Marie's case, because we know she is planning to "Eamest"ly execute both next fall. There is not 
anything too worthy of her. We know no more sincere, dependable and qualified girl. 



(62) 








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Ola Marion 



Graduate in Art. 



"Seraphs share with thee knowledge; but Art, O Man, is thine alone." Although Ola has only been 
with us one year, we realize that she is a rare treasure — the personification of art, much good sense, and 
a genial disposition. 



(64) 



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Mary Frances Rankin 



Graduate in Art. 



"It is through art and art only that we can realize our perfection; through art and art only that we can 
shield ourselves from the sordid perils of actual existence." A writer, a painter, the possessor of a gentle 
and noble character — this is Mary Frances, our talented, town-student Senior. 



(65) 












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Senior Poem 

Four years ago, when first we met, 

Aglow with love and youth, 
Each hand reached for the other's hand, 

To start the quest for truth; 
We searched each day in rocky paths, 

Intent to find the prize; 
Sometimes we stumbled by the way, 

Yet never failed to rise. 

We ve reached the parting of the ways, 

That clasp must broken be, 
Behind us he sweet memories, 

Before, eternity. 
We separate, but not for long, 

For when our search is o'er 
Our hands, grown strong, will touch again 
i o break the bond no more. 

Chronicles of Class of '20 

SEPT. 16, 16 — we hit hear today in gud style and tuke our furst coarse in classifashun. sum 
of us wanted to tak the lieceum coarse, but the boss of the collige sede that warn't nuthing but a side 
lite, so we put our names downe for a degree, we don't know what that is cause all the degrees we 
no about is on the thermometers, we air about to git lokated and about the only cumplante we nos of 
is this buzyness of buying bath tickets and heat. 

Sept. 30, '16 — we had a meeting of all us green ones today. louise davis got nominated and put 
in for pressident. then we elecked purple and gray for our class colors and the jabberwock for our 
class animale. "ez their wuz know further buziness the mealing adjourned" — (we learned that laste 
nite). 

October 14, 16 — tonite we had the big celebrashun of the seson. the societies had a bandquit 
together for us. we wuz mity proude they thot about it because we thot they had furgotten we wuz 
hear since we got joined to socity. they had a knew coarse called toast, we expekted a fancy dish 
but insted sumbody jest spoke, guess it wuz toasted tongue, our mouths flew wide open, but we didn't 
say nothing — (by request). 

October 30, '16 — "don't be excited over having a beaux, it's just a Fresh-Soph party, you know." 
that explanes itself, anyway we had one more swell time on this occashun. They sho had a knack 
for fancy doings. 

November 25, '16 — Today was field day. we sho wuz surprized that they didn't tak us out to 
hoe cotton or dig tatoes — why it wuzn't nuthing but atherleticks! we ran the fastest, jumped the highest 
and got the trofie with twenty-two points to our credit. 

June 1, '17 — commencement is today, everybody is crying cause the seniors are going to leve 
but we are powerfully glad we are. 

SOPHOMORES 

Sept. 10, '17— TODAY WE GENEROUSLY BESTOWED UPON NAOMI HOWIE THE 
PONDEROUS AND CONGLOMERATED DUTIES OF PRESIDENT OF THE SOPH- 
OMORES. 

October 15, '17— WE ENTERTAINED THE UNSOPHISTICATED ELEMENTS IN 
THIS IMMEDIATE PROXIMITY TODAY AT A S6PH-FRESH MASQUERADE. OUR 
TONGUES ARE INADEQUATE TO EXPRESS THE SPLENDOR AND BRILLIANCE 
OF THE UNPARALLELED SCENE. 

Nov. 23, '17— THE MOST EXCITING, EXHILARATING AND COMMEMORATIVE 
FIELD DAY HAS DIED IN THE GOLDEN WEST. AGAIN WE ARE GLORIOUSLY 
AND SUPREMELY VICTORIOUS. 

Dec. 3, '17— ONE OF OUR FORTY-TWO MAGNETIC AND UNDENIABLY EN- 
LIGHTENED SOPHOMORES WAS ELECTED PRESIDENT OF THE SUNDAY SCHOOL 
CONFERENCE TODAY. OF COURSE IT WAS OUR CONSCIENTIOUS AND RE- 
LIGIOUSLY INCLINED MISSIONARY. WHO WOULD EVEN ANTICIPATE, ARTIC- 
ULATE OR MEDITATE UPON ANY ONE ELSE EXCEPT NAOMI HOWIE? 

(66) 



Feb 14 '18— THE WITS OF OUR EMULATING, ENNOBLING AND ELEVATING 
SISTERS WERE SLIGHTLY INCAPACITATED THIS P. M. (PASSED MERIDIAN) 
WHEN WE ESCORTED THEM OVER THE INTERVENING SPACE FROM THEIR 
EDIFYING HALL TO THE LOWER ROOM (THE GYMNASIUM) TO A VALENTINE 
FESTIVAL. A MOST EULOGISTIC, LAUDACIOUS AND CONSANGUINEOUS DEC- 
LARATION OF OUR VENERATION, ADORATION AND RESPECT WAS PRO- 
CLAIMED. "OH MEMORIES THAT BLESS AND BURN." 

March 1, '18— THE HONORIFIC STABILITY OF OUR CLASS WAS ATTESTED 
TONIGHT WHEN THE CAROLINA DRAMATIC CLUB PRESENTED THEIR MAGNUS 
CORPUSES IN "THE MAN OF THE HOUR" TO A SEETHING AUDIENCE OF 
SPELLBOUND GIRLS. THE PALPITATIONS OF OUR HEARTS CREATED A GREAT 
SENSATION WITHIN OUR CORPORAL MAGNITUDE WHEN WE HAD THE OPPOR- 
TUNITY TO CONVERSE AND MASTICATE ICE CREAM AND CAKE WITH THEM 
AFTERWARDS. 

March 16, '18— WE ATTEMPTED TO PROVE OUR OBSCURE POWERS OF IMITA- 
TION AND IMPERSONATION TODAY WHEN WE SCHEDULED OUR FACULTY 
STUNT. IT WAS QUITE A BOISTEROUS PRODUCTION OF PLEASANTRY, AND 
THE CONCERNED ELEMENTS OF THE AUDIENCE NEARLY CONVULSED IN 
HILARITY. 

P. S.— OUR COUNTENANCES AND PHYSICAL BEARINGS ARE STILL 
STRAINED AS A CONSEQUENCE. 

April 1, '18— ALL OF OUR FORTY-TWO HIGHLY ANIMATED AND SUPERBLY 
ELONGATED SOPHS SLIPPED OUT AT TWELVE, ANTI-MERIDIAN, TO OUR 
SISTERS' CELEBRATION AROUND THE LITTLE TREE. WE ASSISTED IN THE 
UNVEILING OF THE MEMORABLE GRANITE SLAB AT THE PEDES OF THE 
TREE. THEN THEY BESTOWED IN OUR MOST EXCITABLE HAND A LIFE SIZE 
AND COMPLETELY DECORATED AND ADORNED JABBERWOCK BANNER. 
NEXT THEY DECREED BY WILL AND TESTAMENT THAT THE MEMORABLE 
AND SUN KISSED TREE WAS HENCEFORTH OURS. WHO CAN EVER DEPICT 
THE PICTURESQUENESS OF THE OCCASION, AND WHO CAN DESCRIBE THE 
EMOTIONS THAT FILLED OUR CIRCULATORY SYSTEMS AND THE SENSATIONS 
THAT NAVIGATED OUR VERTEBRAE? 

June 4, '18— OUR MIDNIGHT SLUMBERS WERE SUDDENLY ALTERED AND 
DISTURBED EARLY THIS ANTI-MERIDIAN BY ALARM CLOCKS. THEY SUM- 
MONED US TO THE MEADOWS TO THE DAISY CHAIN MAKING AND, LIKE 
HEROES, WE AROSE MANFULLY AND JUBILANTLY. IT MUST BE RECORDED 
AND REMEMBERED THAT WE WERE DESIGNING THE CHAIN FOR OUR BE- 
LOVED SISTERS. 

June 6, '18— OUR NEVER-TO-BE-FORGOTTEN, NEVER-TO-BE-NEGLECTED, 
NEVER-TO-BE-TORTURED SISTERS ARE GONE. OH, THE AGONIZING GROANS 
THAT REND OUR HEARTS. HOWEVER, WE ARE NOW 

JUNIORS 

Sept. 18, '18 — For the first time in the history of the school, we are having Junior Hall. Oh, 
we are thrilled to a peanut over it! The tea room has already started, and most of us are in the 
dough business, although the proceeds are not as doughy as one might think. Martha Adams, our 
president, says we can't give it up, and, like all presidents, she knows. 

Oct. 20, '18 — Influenza swept down Junior Hall today, and from all prospects we "flu" — at 
least to the quarantine ward. 

Nov. 1, '18 — Nothing of importance today except we bought two Liberty Bonds. Rich? That's 
us all over, Mabel. 

Dec. 6, '18 — We spent most of the afternoon preparing, discussing and cussing the "Junior Feed" 
for tonight. Believe us, it was some feed! We even fed our minds with the ages of the whole 
class. Ah, Buddie! Thirty-one confessions are good for the soul. 

Jan. 5, '19 — Invitations to Helen Hoods' wedding arrived. This makes the third wedding in 
the class, Elizabeth Harriss and Clara Steele having preceded her. A diploma or a husband — 
that's our ticket! 

Feb. 14, '19 — Mr. and Mrs. Curtis invited us to a picnic supper, and of all picnics, this one 
takes the cake. It's no wonder we can't hand the college menu a thing. 

Feb. 20, '19 — Ice cream business is still in progress 

March 12, '19 — There's not a Junior up here who isn't scrubbing today. No, not the floor, 
nor her clothes, but her face and hands. Last night we gave the minstrel — Nuf Ced! 

(67) 



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MASCOT OF '20 

APRIL 25, '19 — We didn't forget our big 
sisters last night when we gathered around the 
little tree. Some of them were present, and with 
our stepmother, Mrs. Alley, we had a huge 
time! ! Oh, we mean we were excited! Mr. 
Hurley, our faculty member, couldn't be there, 
because, you see, it was — sh-h-h-h — at twelve 
o'clock! ! Yes, ugh-hugh, at midnight. That 
made it so much more romantic! ! 

APRIL 26, '19 — Field Day rolled around again, 
and Goody! the basketball championship is still 
ours. Oh, it was so thrilling and exciting — our 
hair almost stood on the tip ends of nowhere. 
Result: thirty-one voiceless Juniors! But happy? 
There's no word for it! ! 

May 2, '19 — The cream business is still in 
progress. Net results: about 98c. The mystery 
- — Junior-Senior Banquet! The Puzzle — Pro- 
ceeds ! 

May 6, '19 — Did you say evening dresses? 



Well, we never knew before there were so 
many kinds. Our little sisters showed us the 
kind they preferred about two seconds before 
party time tonight. We had pecks of fun at 
the dress parade — and eats — well, just offer us 
anything else now, and hear us give a yell for a 
"Jew Fast." 

May 13, '19 — All's well — the banquet was 
given tonight at the Guilford Hotel. Mr. Hur- 
ley, our old stand-by, was toastmaster, and the 
Guilford chef, the menu man. Everybody was 
happy as larks, and the raindrops outside didn't 
fall a bit faster than our hearts beat. 

May 20 TO 30, '19 — Cramming plus pencils, 
plus paper, plus ten days, equals Examinations. 
"The hours we spent Oh, well, it's over 

now, and Commencement is here. Who says we 
aren't marshals and 

SENIORS. 

Oct. I, '19 — Most of the initial social func- 
tions are passed and we have commenced the 
last year of our glorious four. Blanche Erwin 
is our president, and with her thirty-one staunch 
Seniors, are bending their efforts in service and 
work for their Alma Mater. 

Oct. 12, '19 — Caps and gowns were donned 
today, with the assistance of our little sisters. 
Our minds in unison question, "Shall we not al- 
ways uphold the dignity and honor of our robes? 

Oct. 20, '19 — Today we tramped out to the 
Youngs and had a regular picnic. We kodaked, 
climbed haystacks, rode ponies and lounged in 
the shade. What more welcome joy could busy 
Seniors crave? 

Nov. 26, '19 — The victories of field day were 
not favorable to '20, as in previous years. Both 
the trophy and basketball championship were lost; 
but we are reminded that it is victorious to lose 
nobly. 

Nov. 30, '19 — After various attempts to enter- 
tain our sisters, we carried them for a trolley 
ride and picnic today. It was not our original 
plan, but we look forward to the spring for the 
realization of this. 

Dec. 12, '19 — We laid aside our mantle of 
dignity tonight and produced "A District School" 
as our stunt. Short dresses on lank and lean 
girls, long dresses on short and stumpy girls — 
these were some of the ridiculous combinations. 

Jan. 24, '20 — Mid-term exams are passed and 
the Seniors' records are clean. Could we not 
wish that our records would always be spotless? 

Jan. 27, '20 — The Senior Annual goes to 
press, and with it the final words from the Class 
of '20. There lie before us only four months, 
and then as a ship sets sail in the wide and 
tumultuous sea, we set sail in the sea of life. Can 
we ever forget the days we have spent together, 
the hours we have labored for a common cause, 
the friends we have found, the joys we have 
known, mingled, it is true, with disappointments? 
Can we ever forget the faith we have had in 
one another, and does not this faith spur us on 
to a life that is worth while? 



(68) 









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Junior Mascot : 

Motlo : He who labors conquers 



Floluer : Violet 



The White Elephant 
Colors: Blue and Gold 




Junior Class Officers 

Rachel May Taylor President 

Mary Lyall Lane Vice-President 

Ursula Boyd Secretary 

Faye Savage Treasurer 

C69) 







Pauline Blalock 
"If music be the food of love, play on.' 



Emma Bailey 
'Small, but big of heart and mind. 
Capable, diligent; a girl of the rarest kind." 

Ursula Boyd 
"Things of the greatest value 
Are done up in the smallest packages." 
Elizabeth Boyd Faye Clegc 

"The surest pledge of a deathless name "The only jewel which will not decay is Knowledge. 

Is the silent homage of thoughts unspoken." 




Mary Cole Ruby Fuller 

'Her air, her mariner, all who saw admired. "A face with gladness overspread 

Courteous, tho' coy, and gentle tho' retired." Soft smiles by human kindness bred." 

Lucy Harris 
"A sweet, attractive kind of grace, 
A full assurance given by looks." 
Blanche Hinshaw Sadie Jenkins 

"Neatness, simplicity, kindliness combined "And still they gazed, and still the wonder grew 

With gentle heart and open mind." That one small head could carry all she knew. 



m 




Frances Jones 
'Her heart is true as steel." 



Lucile Johnson 
"Grace was in all her steps, heav'n in her eye 
In every gesture, dignity and love." 
Gladys Keel 
"Wit she has, and a joy in life; 
A splendid girl, sincere and true." 
Mozelle King Mary Lyall Lane 

'Truth, that's brighter than gems. "She's kind, she's modest, sincere and true, 

Trust, that's purer than pearl." More studious, more generous than any of you." 



iflimii^i 




Annie Laurie Lowrance Margaret Martin 

'Excels in studies, as in fun, "Tis her exuberated spirit that makes life the joy 

Her duties never left undone." of living." 

Eglantine Merrit 
'"Tis virtue that doth make her most admired." 
Faye Savage Louise Quinn 

"Mindful not of herself." "To know her is to love her." 

(73) 










Louise Sloan 
'She attains whatever she pursues." 



Ola Smathers 
"Heart on her lips, and soul within her eyes, 
Soft as her clime, and sunny as the skies." 
Rachel May Taylor 
"A girl who's merry, a girl with character; 
One whom we all love because she's lovable." 
Mae West - Olivia Wooseley 

"Modest, sweet, musical too — "Her face is a letter of recommendation 

Just an all-round girl." And her heart is a letter of credit." 




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(75) 



'Hilt 






To Our Freshmen Sisters 



Deep in our hearts arises 

A love that is strong and true. 
Our minds are ever turning, 

Dear Freshman Class, to you, 
It grows, pervades our being 

With a joy that could ne'er grow old, 
When the Red and White are mingled 

With our colors, Blue and Gold. 



We see in you the promise 

Of things that are high and good; 
We trust you, would not change you 

For others if we could. 
You are our Little Sisters, 

Strong ties bind us to you. 
May chains of love and friendship 

Bind you to the Gold and Blue. 









To Our Mascot 



O white elephant, it is in you 
That the class of '21 has its 
Strength, its solidity, and power. 
In you, our mascot, ever calm, 
And self-possessed, 
Endurance, boldness and 
Fortitude are combined. In 
You there is no fear, no 
Wavering from the right, no 



Fickle thoughts nor changing 
Purposes. You are a symbol 
Of force and might, of all 
That is noble and strong. 
We love you, white elephant, 
We love you, and trusting in 
You we press onward, knowing 
Ever that "he who labors 
Conquers." 






'Us" — Seen Thru a Glass Darkly 






A delicate air has "Jenks," 

And boisterous is Louise, 
A chatterbox is Lyall 

And Blanche just loves to tease. 
Poor Margaret's always sad, 

While "Egle" sings and plays; 
And Lula Faye's a flirt, 

And Rachel's mad always. 
Our Lucy hates the men, 

But Elizabeth loves them all ; 
And Sula brags and boasts, 

And Lucile's feet are small. 
Our Emma is so big — 

And Louise Sloan so low 



And Faye's a selfish beast; 

Pauline has not a beau. 
Mary breaks every rule, 

And Ruby never smiles. 
Gladys is in bed at ten. 

And Frances time beguiles. 
Olivia does not practice 

And Ola does not cram. 
Mae sits up on class 

And says, "I don't know, ma'am. 
Annie Laurie is the vamp, 

And Mozelle talks too loud. 
But if you knew this class 

You'd love the entire crowd. 






(76) 















ME 




SOFHOMiRCS 



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CLASS 
of 

1922 







Motto : Through Trials to Triumph 









Flower: White Rose 



Colors: Blue and White 



Sophomore Class Officers 



Bessie Clarke President 

Helen Reynolds .... Vice-President 

Lucile Jones ... Secretary 

Fannie Sutton . . ., Treasurer 

Bessie Raby Mascot 



(77) 







Florence Adams 

Four Oaks 

Annie Lea Atwater 

Burlington 

Grace Bencini 

High Point 



E xlyn Burton 

Asheville 

Edith Ader 

Asheville 

Dorothy Aycock 

Pantego 



Ethel Bost 

Huntersville 

Hazel Carlyle 

Lumberton 

Aileen Aiken 

Hickory 



Ruth Balsam 

New York City 

Eunice Boyette 

Chadburne 

Lucy Clapp 

Greensboro 




Catherine Clegg 

Charlotte 
Alta Deb nam 

Clayton 
Mabel Fisher 

Andrews 



Katherine Galloway 

Fairmont 

Ruth Cotton 

Smithneld 

Verna Edwards 

Asheville 



Lois Frye 
Bryson City 

Marjorie Harper 
Kinston 

Margaret Craven 
Abbo'.tsburg 



Eula Maie Farmfr 

Clayton 

Ruth Fulton 

Winston-Salem 

Louise Harris 

Elkin 










Ethel Hatcher 

Mount Olive 

Mary Hudgins 

Marion 

Margaret Johnson 

Greensboro 



Mary Ella Lowe 

Mt. Holly 

Nina Hickman 

Granite Falls 

Blanche Ingram 

Mount Gilead 



Lucile Jones 
Elizabeth City 
Clara Moore 

Mocksville 

Mildred Hill 

Kinston 



Julia Jerome 

Wingate 

Rose Jones 

Fairmont 

Lenna Newton 

Shelby 




Irene Ormond 

Hookerton 

Helen Reynolds 

High Point 

Elizabeth Robbins 

Winston-Salem 



Foster Shaw 

Weldon 

Odelle Peacock 

High Point 

Kathleen Rhem 

Dover 



Irene Robinson 

Elon College 
Ruth Smithwick 

La Grange 

Pauline Peeler 

Salisbury 



Annie Mae Robbins 

Winston-Salem 

Virginia Sharpe 

Statesville 

Treva Smitherman 

Winston-Salem 




Fannie Sutton 

Kinston 

Beulah Williams 

Rowland 



Lelia Strauchan 

Selma 

Cara Wrenn 

Siler City 

WlNNTFRED SUNDEAN 

Minneapolis, Minn. 



Minnie Woodard 

Black Mountain 

Bessie Clarke 

President Class of 1922 

Conway, S. C. 



(82) 



mm 




Associate Members Sophomore Class 



Elizabeth Bailey 

Walnut Cove 

Bess Huckabee 

Albemarle 

Martha Lee North 

Burlington 



JOSEPHINE SL'NDEAN 

M : nneapolis, Minn. 

Bessie May Bell 

Washington 

Aleph JONES 

Belhaven 



Elva Sheek 

Mocksvilli 

Christine Walker 

Roxboro 

Inez Edgerton 

Kenly 



Margaret Lane 

Mount Vernon Springs 

Altie Stone 

Kittrell 

Mildred Williams 

Hendeison 



Sophomore Hobbies 



Florence Adams "Roses 

EDITH Ader "Social Service 

Aileen Aiken "English II (?) 

Annie Lee Atwater "Lux 

DOROTHY AYCOCK "Frankness 

Elizabeth Bailey "Practical Joking 

Ruth Balsam "Vogue 

Bessie Mae Belle "Orations 

Grace Bencini "System 

ETHEL Bost "Practicing 

Eunice Boyette "Giggles 

Evelyn Burton "Teasing 

Hazel Carlyle "Yarns 

Bessie Clarke "Class of '22 

Lucy Clapp ■ ■ • "Dixie 

Catherine Clegg "Musing 

Ruth Cotton "Studies 

Margaret Craven "Guilford 

Alta Debnam "Curls 

Inez Edgerton "Banking 

Verna Ewards "Preachers 

Eula Maie Farmer "85 Hudson 

Mabel Fisher "T. B. S. 

Lois Frye "Young Folks 

Ruth Fulton " . . . . "Crushing 

Katharine Galloway "Art 

Marjorie Harper "Sleeping 

Louise Harris "Cracking Nuts 

Ethel Hatcher "Givin_ 

Nina Hickman "Sweets 

Mildred Hill "Loving 

Bess Huckabee "Kisses 

Mary Hudgins "Visiting 

Blanche Ingram "Hills 

Julia Jerome "Serving 

Margaret Johnson "Gaining 

Lucille Jones "Her Family 

Rose Jones "String Band 

Aleph Jones "Eats 

Margaret Lane "Daddy 

Mary Ella Lowe "Home 

(84) 



Sophomore Hobbies — ( Continued ) 

Clara Moore "Main 

Lenna Newton "Hershey's 

Martha Lee North "Burlington 

IRENE ORMOND ; . . . "Arrangements 

Odelle Peacock "Tennis 

Pauline Peeler "Neatness 

Helen Reynolds "Singing' 

Kathleen Rhem "Movies' 

Annie May Robbins "Making Candy 

Elizabeth Robbins "Primping 

Irene Robinson "Brother Jack 

Virginia Sharpe "Bestest 

Foster Shaw "Blowing Bubbles 

ELVA ShEEK "Painting 

Ruth Smithwick •. "Raving 

Treva Smitherman "Hawaii 

FANNIE SUTTON "Strictly Business 

A k LTIE STONE "Basketball 

Lelia Straughan "Cats 

Josephine Sundean "Heart Trouble 

Winnifred Sundean "Athletics 

Christine Walker "Dates 

Beulah Williams "Drug Store 

Mildred Williams "Charity Barrel 

BlLLIE WooDARD "Spreading Joy 

Cara Frances Wren "Camp Fire 




(85) 



- 




W&& 







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SOPHOMORE MAIDS ON DUTY AND OFF 



(86) 







Motto: Numquam non paratus est Flor»er : Red Rosebud Colors: Red and White 

Class of 1923 
Officers 

Lois Howie President 

Mary Douglas Gay Vice-President 

Susie Meyers Secretary and Treasurer 









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(88) 



Freshman Class Roll 



Aileen Aiken 
Johnnie Vick Bottoms 
Margaret Crowson Boylan 
Virginia Chester Brawley 
Mayme Sutton Browne 
Annie Caroline Burch 
Sara Rebecca Carlyle 
Jessie Mae Chappelle 
Linda Gray Clement 
Emily Elizabeth Cole 
Elizabeth Creech 
Dixie Lee Curtis 
Hannah Marion Cutts 
Matilda Jannette Davis 
Verna Larue Davis 
Bertie Efird 
Alberta Fuller 
Mary Douglas Gay 
Mary Leonora Gidney 
Marjorie Elizabeth Godwin 
Julia Worth Graham 
Marjorie Hardee 
Grace Mildred Harper 
Beulah May Harris 
Kathleen Hicks 



Rachel Maude Hinson 

Lillian Fields Hooks 

Lois Howie 

Julia Anderson Hunt 

Helen Ione Hurley 

Iva Jeanette 

Gertrude Preston Jones 

Eloise Jones 

Sarah Ellen Keels 

Ida Pettit Kent 

Lillie Lamont Kyle 

Bonte Loftin 

Aileen Lowrance 

Bess Lewis 

Grace Louise Kipka 

Elizabeth W. McGowan 

Carrie Alston Mann 

Helen Rosenthal May 

Helen Leora Morgan 

Clarabel Morris 

Helen Marie Morton 

Susie Kathleen Myers 

Esther Belle Newberry 

Edna Ormond 

Irene Lindon Parker 

Alice Norma Partin 

Ruth Mozelle Peace 

Virginia Phillips 

Mary Pierce 

Katherene Asenith Pickett 

Margaret Elizabeth Reed 

Hazel Richardson 

Mary Kiva Richardson 

Vera Katherine Richardson 

Marguerite Ring 



Mary Elizabeth Ring 

Mattie Lou Russell 

Mary Sanders 

Thelma Janice Sanford 

Beatrice Earle Saunders 

Mary Magdalene Saunders 

Alene Gaye Savage 

Kate Shu ford 

Ida Sledge 

Lillie May Stanford 

Orpah Steed 

Bessie Tesh 

Clara Trollinger 

Mahv Scott Tucker 

Irene Byrd Walker 

Katherine Walker 

Ruth Welborn 

Nellie Boddie Wellons 

Sarah Elizabeth White 

Fannie Pearle Widenhouse 

Aldythe Wilson 

Minnie Selma Wilsqn 

Beth Winstead 

Josephine Elizabeth Wood 

Mabel Estelle Wooten 



(89) 




THE FRESHMEN AS THEY SEEM AND AS THEY ARE 



(90) 




Members of Art Class 



Florence Adams 


Ruth Curtiss 


Julia Hunt 


Mary F. Rankin 


Emma Bailey 


Inez Edgerton 


Eloise Jones 


Beatrice Saunders 


Margaret Bain 


Ruth Edwards 


Sara Ellen Lightfoot 


Mary Saunders 


Helen Barnes 


Katherine Galloway 


Margaret Martin 


Elva Sheek 


Pauline Blalock 


Margery Godwin 


Ola Marion 


Bessie Tate 


Mayme Browne 


Elizabeth Goolsby 


Helen May 


Mary B. Wilson 


Elizabeth Creech 


Marie Gregson 


Ethel Proctor 





(91) 




Commercial Class 
Officers 

Lorraine Burgess President 

Mary Lillian Sink Vice-President 

Mary Wilson Secretary and Treasurer 

Members 

Cora Allen Grace Fagge Maude McNeely Vera Richardson 

Ethel Baxter Margaret Gill Elizabeth Pierce Beatrice Saunders 

Mildred Bostian Eloise Harriss Vera Pullen Mary Lillian Sink 

Lorraine Burgess Helen Leslie Eva Pleasants Lily May Stanfield 

Helen Curry Mary McKay Nell Reich Mary A. Wilson 

(92) 





taittizaftcm 



BOOK III 



3iim 




Emma Bailey 
Louise Foy 
Bernice Nicholson 
Odelle Peacock 
Bessie Clarke 



PRESIDENT S FORUM 

First Row — Muse, Howie, N., Adams, M., Erwin 
Second Row — Taylor, R., Clark, Howie, L., Burgess 
Third Row— Sills, Davis, Morris, L. 



Student Council 

Naomi Howie 
Lucile Johnson 
Louise Quinn 
Lucy Harris 
Rachel May Taylor 



Inez Smithwick 

Lucile Morris 

Nell Davis 

Annie Laurie Lowrance 

Edith Ader 









(95) 



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(96) 




Officers of Students' Association 

Nell Davis President 

INEZE SmitHWICK 1st Vice-President 

Emma Bailey 2nd Vice-President 

Annie Laurie Lowrance Recording Secretary 

Louise Quinn Corresponding Secretary 

Edith Ader Treasurer 

(97) 







Officers of Y. W. C. A. 

Naomi Howie President 

Louise Elliott Vice-President 

Marie Young Secretary 

Bessie Buckner Treasurer 

Madge Sills . . . Undergraduate Field Representative 



(98) 










Executive Committee of Y. W. C. A. 

Naomi Howie President 

Louise Elliott Chairman of Membership Committee 

Marie Young Secretary 

Bessie Buckner Chairman of Finance Committee 

Margaret Martin Chairman of Social Committee 

Sadye Jenkins Chairman of Publicity Committee 

Mary Cole Chairman of Service Committee 

Emma Bailey Chairman of Religious Wor\ Committee 

Elizabeth Austin Chairman of lVorld-Fellon>ship Committee 

Madge SlLLS Undergraduate Field Representative 






(99) 







Officers of the Irving Literary Society 

Nellie Muse President Pauline Blalock Treasurer 

Bernice Nicholson .... Vice-President Margaret Martin Critic 

Annie Griffin Secretary Lucile Johnson Censor 

(100) 




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Emerson Literary Society 

Officers 



Martha Adams President 

Blanche Erwin Vice-President 

Inez Smithwick Secretary 



Louise Elliott Treasurer 

Mary Lily Cox Censor 

Kate Warlick Critic 



(102) 










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(103) 













Dramatic Club 

Officers 

Annie Griffin President 

Inez Edgerton Vice-President 

Lucy Clapp - Secretory and Treasurer 

Nellie Muse Critic 

Members 

Katharine Bacon Clara Gant Nellie Muse 

Sarah Carlyle Annie Griffin Ruth Smithwick 

Lucy Clapp Beulah Harris Claire Stafford 

Margaret Craven Mary E. Jones Foster Shaw 

Ruth Edwards Margaret Johnson Margaret Taylor 

Inez Edgerton Lilly Kyle Rachel May Taylor 

Loise Frye Sara Ellen Lightfoot Mary Wilson 

Lucy Mayo 

(104) 




Nordica Club 



Josephine Sundean 
Louise Jeanette 
Joe Wood 
Mildred Bostian 
Louise Elliott 
Blanche Erwin 
Hazel Richardson 
Bess Huckabee 
Gladys Keel 
Mattie Lou Russell 
Esther Newberry 
Louise Sloan 
Bernice Nicholson 



Nell Wellons 
Mary Richardson 
Annie Laurie Lowrance 
Helen May 
Elizabeth Creech 
Hazel Carlyle 
Helen Hurley 
Sadie Jenkins 
Florence Adams 
Beatrice Saunders 
Annie Burch 
Iva Jeanette 



Lucile Morris 
Bessie Mae Bell 
Edna Ormond 
Mayme Brown 
Marjorie Hardee 
Ruth Edwards 
Grace Harper 
Nell Muse 
Mary Louise Harreli 
Mildred Hill 
Bessie Buckner 
Nell Reich 
Helen Reynolds 



(105) 










G. C. W. Traveling Glee Club 

Mr. Benjamin S. Bates Director 

Mr. L. B. Hurley Manager 

Miss Annie Pecram Chaperone 



SOPRANO 

Bessie Buckner 
Gladys Keel 
Edna Ormond 
Virginia Philips 
Mattie Lou Russell 
Helen Reynolds 
Louise Sloan 
Mary Stokes 

Martha Adams 
Florence Adams 
Evelyn Burton 



SECOND SOPRANO 
Florence Adams 
Louise Elliott 
Louise Jeannette 
Iva Jeannette 
Bernice Nicholson 
Marguerite Ring 

INSTRUMENTS 
Lorraine Burgess Rose Jones 



Louise Elliott 



Gladys Keel 



ACCOMPANIST 

Miss Thelma Harrell 

(106) 



ALTO 
Mildred Bostian 
Blanche Erwin 
Mary Louise Harrell 
Sadie Jenkins 
Nellie Muse 
Nell Reich 



Nellie Muse 
Bernice Nicholson 
Mary Stokes 




String Band 



Bess Huckabee 
Joe Sundean 
Inez Edgerton 
Florence Adams 
Hazel Carlyle 
Treva Smitherman 
Martha Adams 
Irene Ormond 



Mary Stokes 
Louise Elliott 
Ruth Smithwick 
Nell Muse 
Odelle Peacock 
Christine Walker 
Evelyn Burch 
Gladys Keel 



Bernice Nicholson 
Alta Debnam 
Catherine Walker 
Ruth Balsam 
Rose Jones 
Helen Reynolds 
Edna Ormond 



(107) 




Browning Club 



Officers 

M/rtha Evelyn Morris President 

Pauline Blalock Vice-President 

Edna Ormond Secretary and Treasurer 

Members 

Florence Adams Sadie Jenkins 

Ruth Balsam Mozelle King 

Pauline Blalock Grace Kipka 

Nell Davis Martha Evelyn Morris 

Louise Elliott Edna Ormond 

Helen Goode Ruth Peace 

Naomi Howie Mildred Perkins 



Helen Reynolds 
Mary Richardson 
Marguerite Ring 
Elizabeth Robbins 
Rebecca Simpson 
Louise Sykes 
Mollie Williams 



(108) 










Bencamin S. Bates 
Professor of Voice 



The Order of the Nightingale 

Officers 

Bessie Buckner President 

Ben j. S. Bates Instructor 

Mary Louise Harrell Secretary 

Thelma Harrell Assistant 



Elizabeth Austin 
Bessie Mae Bell 
Bessie L. Buckner 
Mildred Bostian 
Mamye Browne 
J. Foster Barnes 
Dixie Curtis 
Flossie Denny 
Inez Edgerton 
Ruth Edwards 
Maud Gillikin 
Ruby Groom 
Mary Louise Harrell 
Bess Huckabee 
Marjorie Hardee 
Mary Hawkins 



Members 

Grace Harper 
Sadie Jenkins 
Eloise Harris 
Frances Jones 
Louise Jannette 
Gladys Keel 
M. Lowdermilk 
Helen Morten 
Lady Mitchell 
Mrs. Cummins Mebane 
Lucile Morris 
Bernice Nicholson 
Edna Ormond 
Miss Annie Pegram 
Virginia Phillips 
Nell Reich 
Mattie Lou Russell 



Hazel Richardson 
Helen Reynolds 
Annie Mae Robbins 
Mrs. Hugh R. Scott 
Ailene Savage 
Mary Saunders 
Louise Sloan 
Mrs. Fred Sparger 
Mary Stokes 
Mrs. Ralph Sykes 
Miss Marguerite Tuthill 
Thelma Taylor 
Bessie Tesh 
Molly Williams 
Sarah White 
Joe Wood 



(109) 






3 a 







(110) 



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Roll of the Music School 



Florence Adams 
Edith Ader 
Katherine Bacon 
Marguerite Bain 
Ruth Balsam 
Mildred Bastian 
Bessie May Bell 
Pauline Blalock 
Ethel Bost 
Johnnie Bottoms 
Sadie Britt 
Mary Brooks 
Mamie Brown 
Bessie Buckner 
Annie Bush 
Hazel Carlyle 
Bessie Clarke 
Mary Cole 
Ruth Cotton 
Dixie Curtis 
Verna Davis 
Nell Davis 
John L. Davis 
Ineze Edgerton 
Ruth Edwards 
Bertie Efird 
Louise Elliott 
Annie L. Fields 
Edna Fields 
Mabel Fisher 
Ruby Fuller 
Maude Gillikin 
Mary Godwin 
Helen Goode 



Elizabeth Goolsby 
Julia Graham 
Ruby Groom 
Samuel Groom 
Marjorie Hardee 
Grace Harper 
Mary Louise Harrell 
Thelma Harrell 
Eloise Harris 
Nina Hickman 
Rachel Hinson 
Sallie Holt 
Lillian Hooks 
Naomi Howie 
Bessie Huckabee 
Jennie Isaacson 
L. M. Iseley 
Sadie Jenkins 
Iva Jennette 
Louise Jennette 
Lucile Johnson 
E. Jones 

Mary Elizabeth Jones 
Lucile Jones 
Rose Jones 
Gladys Keel 
Isabelle Keener 
Mozelle King 
Mrs. Kinsworth 
Grace Kipka 
Mary Lyle Lane 
Margaret Lane 
Helen Leslie 



Bessie Lewis 
Elizabeth McGowen 
Carrie Austin Mann 
Lady Mitchell 
Helen Morgan 
Martha Evelyn Mcrris 
Lucile Morris 
Helen Morton 
Susie Myers 
Irene Ormond 
Edna Ormond 
Irene Parker 
Ruth Peace 
Odelle Peacock 
Mildred Perkins 
Mary Pierce 
Sadie Pitts 
Virginia Phillips 
Mildred Platt 
Marguerite Pugh 
Annie Purcell 
Kate Rankin 
Helen Reynolds 
Nell Reich 
Hazel Richardson 
Mary Richardson 
Marguerite Ring 
Irene Robinson 
Lucy Robertson 
Elizabeth Ropbins 
Annie May Robbins 
Mattie Lou Russell 
Thelma Sanford 



Beatrice Saunders 
Mary Saunders 
Aleen Savage 
Ida Sledge 
Rebecca Simpson 
Louise Sloan 
Orpah Steed 
Mary Stokes 
Lelia Straughn 
Mrs. Stroud 
A. L. Sustaire 
Louise Sykes 
Thelma Taylor 
Margaret Taylor 
Lucile Teague 
Clara Trollinger 
Mary Scott Tucker 
Marguerite Tuthill 
Christine Walker 
Irene Walker 
Laura M. West 
Sarah White 
Fannie Widenhouse 
James Wilkins 
Minnie Wilson 
Mary A. Wilson 
Aldyth Wilson 
Beulah Williams 
Beth Winstead 
Margaret Womack 
Josephine Wood 
Minnie Woodard 
Olivia Woosley 
Hazel Wray 






(111) 






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(115) 










Athletic Association Officers 

Lucile Morris President 

Lucy Harris Vice-President 

Ruth Balsam Secretary 

Odelle Peacock Treasurer 

(116) 







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Field Day Masque — The Shepherds 



(118) 




Field Day Masque — The Months 
(119) 










Field Day Masque — Masque of Pomona 
(120) 




Field Day Masque — Masque of Pomona 
(121) 



















Field Day Masque — Rose Maidens 
(122) 




Field Day Masque — The Greek Chorus 
(123) 



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Field Day Masque — Spanish Maids and Shepherds 
(124) 






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Field Day Masque — Greek Maidens 
(125) 













May Day — The May Queen and Her Attendants 






(126) 



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May Day— 1920 and 1922 In Action 
A Hotly Fought Contest 

(127) 
















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First Place Winners — Spring and Fall Field Day Contests 



(128) 




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RELAY TEAMS AND G CLUB 
(132) 




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(133) 






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RELAY TEAMS 
Sophomore Team — WoODARD, Craven, Wrenn, Senior Team — Barnes, Griffin, WarlICK, 

Aiken Foy 

(134) 










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RELAY TEAMS 

Freshman Team — Morris, LoFTIN, RlNG, Junior Team — TAYLOR, Boyd, SAVAGE, 

Lowrance Johnson 

(135) 



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Miss Winnie Sundean, '22 

Tennis Champion of Southern Woman's Colleges 

(140) 






Field Day, May 1, 1919 



Five o'clock came none loo soon on 
the morning of May 1 , for many were 
up even before that time preparing for 
that eventful day which meant either 
victory or defeat for every one of 
them. The Gabberwock shone forth 
more than usual on that day. At nine 
o'clock amid many yells, the Freshman 
and Junior basketball teams stepped 
out on the court to play one of the 
most exciting games of the season. 
Fate was on the side of the Gabber- 
wock, and this gave the Champion 
Cup to the Juniors. In the tennis 
match, Winnie Sundean who, before 
coming to us, had won for Minnesota 
the championship from Nebraska, was 
victorious in singles, and with Ruth 
Balsam won in doubles. This gave 
the Freshman Class the Champion 
Cup in tennis. Rachael May Taylor 
was the most graceful vaulter, Ernes- 
tine Lambeth the prettiest runner, 
Lucile Johnson the most graceful 
walker, and Naomi Howie the fastest 
walker. The Juniors came out ahead 
on the relay race, and Ernestine Lam- 
beth won the hundred-yard dash. 
The white elephant, the Soph's Class 
Animal, walked off that day with vic- 
tory in his trunk. 

May 1 was our annual May Day. 
It did not dawn fair and beautiful, 
however, as all May days should dawn, but instead, heavy clouds hung low. By the time a great 
many town people had gathered for the crowning of the May Queen and the procession had finally 
formed ranks behind Main building, the dark, low clouds burst, and such a shower you never saw. 
So, it came about that Naomi Howie, our beautiful May Queen, clothed in Queen's raiment was 
crowned as such in the college chapel, the audience having assembled at this place when the storm 
broke. The Maid of Honor, Maurine Britlain, placed the crown upon the May Queen's head, while 
Marlha Adams, Nellie Muse, Mary Lillian Sink, Helen McCrary, Ernestine Lambeth, and Nell 
Davis, the beautifully dressed Waiting Maids, stood near in maidenly reverence. Then followed 
many beautiful folk dances by members of the Gymnasium classes, in honor of Her Majesty. And 
thus the day ended — brighter than it began. 

Field Day, November 15, 1919, was probably more interesting this year ihan ever before. Both 
the veteran athletes and the inexperienced afforded many surprises and thrills. 

The most exciting feature of the day was the struggle between the Seniors and Sophomores for 
the inter-class basketball championship. The Sophomore team won with a score of 20 to 12, although 
the Senior team held an unbeaten record. 

(141) 




Miss Reuben Alley 
Assistant Athletic Director 



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The lineup for the Sophomores was as follows: Misses Lois Fry, Ruth Balsam, Evelyn Burton, 
Irene Ormond, and Hazel Carlyle. The Senior lineup was the Misses Mabel Young, Blanche Erwin, 
Naomi Howie, Kate Warlick and Mary Louise Harrell. 

The second event of the day was the tennis singles, which was also won by the Sophomores. 

The running broad jump was a particularly exciting contest. The winner was Miss Bonte Loftin, 
a Freshman, who jumped twelve feet, 1 inch. Second place went to Miss Minnie Woodard, Sophomore, 
her jump being 11 feet, 11 J/2 inches, and the third place went to Miss Marguerite Ring, a Freshman, 
with a jump of 1 1 feet, 1 1 inches. The standing brocd jump was also a splendid contest and Miss 
Margaret Craven, of the Sophomore Class, won first place, jumping 6 feet, 2 inches. Miss Marguerite 
Ring, Freshman, was second Jumping 6 feet, 1 ]/£ inches, and Miss Kate Warlick, a Senior, third, her 
jump being 6 feet. 

A Freshman, Miss Helen Morgan, because of her uncontested skill, won first place in vaulting. 
Miss Virginia Phillips, Freshman, second, and Miss Rachael Mae Taylor, Junior, third. 

The best time for the 100-yard dash was 19J/2 seconds and was won by Miss Aileen Lowrance, a 
Freshman; second place was won by Miss Myrtle Barnes, Senior, in 20 seconds. 

The results of walking for grace and ease were as follows: Miss Lucille Johnson, Junior, first 
place; Miss Nell Davis, Senior, second place. 

The lineup for the tennis doubles was: Misses Nell Davis and Nellie Muse, Senior team; 
Misses Ruth Balsam and Winnef red Sundean, Sophomore team. The result 6- ; 6- in favor of the 
Sophomores. 

Walking for speed, a most amusing event, was won by Miss Naomi Howie, first. Miss Emma 
Bailey, secdnd. Running for grace and ease went to the Seniors, Miss Nell Davis taking the first 
place; Miss Helen Morgan and Miss Marguerite Ring, Freshmen, won the second and third places. 

For most track-enthusiasts the crowning event of the day was the relay. No one was disappointed 
this year. The Freshman team took first place; Seniors, second place; Sophomores, third. The final 
point score was: 

Seniors 30 Juniors 13 

Sophomores 40 Freshmen 42 

The night before Field Day, November 14th, Miss Robinson presented "The Masque of Pomona," 
assisted by the School of Expression and Physical Training. The following were the cast of 
characters: 

Pomona Goddess of Orchard 

Miss Nellie Muse 

Vertumnus Guardian of the Turning Year, in love with Pomona 

Miss Annie Griffin 

Camilla . " A Mortal, who knows how to contend with Fate 

Miss Lucy Clapp 

The Masque opens with the entrance of November, who beckons for the other Months to come 
and make glad, for they too have helped to bring forth the harvest. 
The Chorus enters singing to the Goddess, followed by 

The Chrysanthemum Maidens, 
Grecian Maids, who bring grapes, 
Shepherds, with their offering of fleece, 
The Maidens, who bring autumn leaves. 



(142) 





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enior nonors ana uegrees 



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1919 



Candidates for A. B. Degree 



Esther Old Aycock 
Annie Ruth Bell 
Lucy Brothers 
Edna Caveness 



Mary Exum Snow 
Verdie Gladys Trollinger 
Gladys Nowell Whedbee 
Ammie Zoe Wilson 



Flossie Hurdle Denny 
Carrie Erwin 
Carrie Harris 
Myrtie Hall Humble 
May Attrice Kernodle 
Daisy Ernestine Lambeth 
Martha Elizabeth Moore 
Jessie Artelia Pillow 
Lillie Gay Shaw 



Candidates for B. M. Degree 

May Maurine Brittain Anna Catherine Holshouser 

Elizabeth May Gibson Katherine Hutton 

Nellie Elizabeth Groome Marjorie Mae Worsham 



Graduate .School of Music 

Piano 
Gaynelle Barnes 



Candidate for Teacher's Certificate in Domestic Science 
and Domestic Art 

Carrie Louise McNeely 

Candidate for Certificate in Art 

Mary Frances Rankin 



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Magna Cum Laude 
Maurine Brittain 
Lucy Brothers 
Myrtie Hall Humble 
Attrice Kernodle 
Mary Exum Snow 

Highest Honors of the Class of 1919 

Myrtie Hall Humble 



(145) 









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Statistics 



Nell Davis Best All-Round 

Madge Sills Cleverest 

Martha Adams Handsomest 

Blanche Erwin Most Attractive 

Nell Muse Most Striking 

Bernice Nicholson Most Talented 

Naomi Howie Most Popular 

Kate Warlick Wittiest 

Odelle Peacock Prettiest 

Louise Elliott Most Winsome 



G. C. W. Types 

Ola Smathers Autumn 

Florence Adams .... Winter 
Esther Belle Nerberry. . Spring 
Iva Jeanette Summer 





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Postmaster, 
Wife Killed 

ROUGEMONT, N.C. (AP) — 
The postmaster of this Durham 
County community and his wife 
died in a fire which destroyed 
their home Saturday night. 

They were Marvin J. Carter 
and Mrs. Iva Carter, both 66. 
Rougemont is about 16 miles 
north of Durham. 

The volunteer fire department 
at nearby Bahama rushed . to 
the scene but the roof had col- 
lapsed by the time the firemen 
arrived. 

Spectators said the heat was 

so intense that authorities were 

delayed in the search for the 

I bodies. 








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The Summer Cirl, Iva JEANETTE 




SENIOR MARSHALS 
JUNIOR MARSHALS 

(161) 



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Lyceum Artists of 1920 

Concerts in the College Auditorium 
ERNEST DAVIS, Tenor— Nov. 12 HAROLD HENRY, Pianist— Jan. 8 

FRANCIS INGRAM, Contralto — April 12 ZOELLNER SIRING QUARTET— Feb. 24 

GEORGE F. BOYLE, Pianist — Oct. 30 

LELAND POWERS, Reader — March 12 



(162) 







Our Metropolitan Artists of 1 920 

Concerts in Municipal Theatre 



FRANCIS ALDA, Soprano — March 11 
RUDOLPH GANZ, Pianist — Feb. IS 

RUSSIAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA; 



AMELITA GALLI-CURCI, Soprano— Jan. 24 
CAROLINE LAZZARI, Contralto — Feb. 18 
LADA; CREATORE OPERA COMPANY 



(163) 






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(164) 



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Commencement, 1919 






(165) 















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(166) 



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Commencement, 1919 



(167) 



Recital Programs 



RECITAL 

By MR. BENJAMIN S. BATES, Tenor, and 
MR. MORTIMER BROWNING, Pianist 

College Auditorium, Thursday, December 
11th, at 8:30 O'clock 

Program 

Beethoven Sonata — Op. 28* 

Andante con Variazioni 
Scherzo 
Piano 

a. Giordani Caro mio ben 

b. Staub L'Heure Silencieuse 

c. Carnel O Tender Eyes 

d. Scott My True Love Lies Asleep 

Tenor 

a. Liszt Valse Impromptu in A flat 

b. Chopin. Two Etudes — Op. 10, No. 5 and No. 12 

c. Saint-Saens Song Without Words 

d. Leschetizky Mazurka — Op. 24, No. 2 

Piano 

Rossini (Cujus Animam) Stabat Mater 

Tenor 

Browning 1 The Melancholy Jester 

Contradictions 
Allegretto 
Despair 
Piano 

a. Sanderson All Joy Be Thine 

Campbell-Tipton The Crying of Water 

Walt Lassie o' Mine 

MacFadyen Inter Nos 

Tenor 



b. 



d. . 



CONCERT 

Complimentary to the Western North Carolina 
Conference M. E. Church, South 

Given by MISSES AGNES CHASTEN, Pianist; 
DIXIE ROBINSON, Reader; MESSRS. MOR- 
TIMER BROWNING, Organist; BEN- 
JAMIN S. BATES, Tenor; ROBERT 

LUDWIG ROY, Violinist 
And the COLLEGE GLEE CLUB 

Conductor, Benjamin S. Bates 
Accompanist, Miss Thelma Harrell 

Program 

Lerman Blossom Time 

Glee Club 

Sarasate Zigeuner Weisen 

(Gypsy Airs) 
Mr. Roy 

Liszt Rhapsodie — No. 8 

Miss Chasten 

Edward Peple The Littlest Rebel 

Miss Robinson 

Czibulka Morning Rise 

Gavotte 
Glee Club 

Faulkes Concert Overture 

in E flat 
Mr. Browning 

Gluck-Buck O Saviour, Hear Me 

Mr. Bates 

Wooler Spring Time 

(Waltz) 
Glee Club 



RECITAL 



By ERNEST DAVIS, Tenor 
MR. MORTIMER BROWNING at the Piano 

Program 

1. Recit. — "His Hideous Love Provokes My Rage" 
Air — "Love Sounds the Alarm" Handel 

(From "Acis and Galatea") 

2. "Che gelida manina" (Narrative 

"La Boheme") Puccini 

3. a. "My Love's an Arbutus" Stanford 

b. "J3reen Sleeves" (Old English) . .Unknown 

c. "Orpheus with His Lute" Sullivan 

4. "Cielo e mar" (Romanza, from "La 

Gioconda") Ponchielli 

5. a. "Thou Art So Like a Flower" . .Chadwick 

b. "I Have a Rendezvous with Death" 

Horsfall 

(Dedicated to Mr. Davis) 

c. "Ah! Love but a Day" Protheroe 

d. "To a Messenger" La Forge 

6. "Celeste Aida" (Romanza, from "Aida") 

Verdi 

Mason and Hamlin Piano used 



PIANO RECITAL 

By GEORGE F. BOYLE 

Program 

J. S. Bach Organ Prelude and Fugue in 

D major 

(Transcribed for piano by Busoni) 

C. Gluck Melodie from "Orpheus" 

(Transcribed by Sgambati) 
Edward MaeDowell. .Sonata in E minor (Keltic) 
Maestoso 

Semplice, teneramente 
Molto allegro, con fuoco 

F. Chopin .Ballade in G minor 

Nocturne in D flat 
Valse in A flat — Op. 42 

Villiers Stanford Two Irish Dances 

(Arranged by Percy Grainger) 

(a) Leprechaun's Dance 

(b) A March Jig 
George F. Boyle Gavotte and Musette 

Evening 
Spring Breeze 

S. Rachmaninoff Melodie in E major 

Franz Liszt La Campanella 

Mason and Hamlin Piano used 



(168) 



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SOPHOMORES "AS IT WERE" AND THE SOPHOMORE STRING BAND 

(169) 






Social Calendar 



April 1, 1919-January 26, 1920 



APRIL 

10-15 — Spring Holidays. 
26— Field Day. 

29 — Senior Recital by Marjorie Worsham and 
Elizabeth Gibson. 

MAY 

2 — Sophomores entertained by Seniors. 

3 — Address by Professor Edwin Greenlaw. 

5 — Gaynelle Barnes' Graduating Recital. 

8 — Katherine Hutton's and Maurine Britain's 

Graduating Recital. 
9 — Nell Groome's and Anna Holshonser's Grad- 
uating Recital. 
13 — Annual Junior-Senior Banquet. 
1 9-30 — Final Examinations. 

JUNE 

2-6 — Commencement Exercises. 

2 — Dramatic Recital. 

3 — Bacculaureate Sermon. 

4 — Class Day Exercises. 

4— Class Play. 

5 — Graduating Exercises. 

5 — Concert by School of Music. 

SEPTEMBER 

10-11 — Classification and Registration. 
14 — New girls entertained by Y. W. C. A. 
1 5 — New girls entertained by Student Associa- 
tion. 
27 — First Chapel Exercise. 



OCTOBER 

1 — Decision Night. 

2 — Inaugural Recital by Professors Browning 
and Bates. 

5 — Y. W. C. A. Recognition Service. 

6 — Senior-Sophomore Picnic. 
10 — -Faculty Recital. 
17 — The Dinner "Mum" Party. 
18 — Sophomores entertain Freshmen. 
25 — Concert by Faculty and Glee Club in honor 

of the Western N. C. Conference. 
26 — Address by Secretary Daniels. 
28 — Rev. G. C Hounshell begins a series of 

meetings 
31 — Hallowe'en Dinner. 
31 — Piano Recital by George F. Boyle. 

NOVEMBER 

21 — Juniors entertain Freshmen. 

25 — Voice Recital by Ernest Davis. 

27 — Thanksgiving. 

DECEMBER 
6 — Inter-Society Reception. 
1 1 — Faculty Recital — Professors Bates and 

Browning. 
1 3 — Senior Stunt. 

19 — The Santa Clause Party for the poor chil- 
dren of Greensboro. 
22 — Christmas holidays began. 

JANUARY 

6 — Girls returned to school. 
8 — Piano Recital by Harold Henry. 
1 6-24 — Mid-year examinations. 



(170) 



IHH 




Work of the Y. W. C. A. 

^P HEN the 1 91 9-20 officers of the Y. W. C. A. entered upon their respective 
duties in the spring of 1919, we little realized what a vast opportunity for 
service lay ahead. Since that time we have been faithfully striving to 
make the Association a vital force in the life of Greensboro College for 
Women and as we stand at the end of our administration, we feel that 
in a small way we have succeeded. 

At the beginning of school, all of the old girls, knowing from experience the meaning 
and value of the Y. W. C. A., enthusiastically initiated the newcomers into its privileges 
and opportunities, so that when our Recognition Service rolled round, every girl on the 
College Hill pledged herself a loyal member of the organization. The symbolic candles 
which were lighted that night are still burning, and we trust they shall never grow dim. 

Early in the fall a series of evangelistic services was held by Dr. C. G. Hounshell, 
assisted by Miss Helen Hardy. At the beginning of the meeting we had no conception 
whatsoever of the great blessing that was in store for us, but now we realize that its 
influence permeated our every activity. 

During the recent year a larger feeling of social consciousness has developed among 
our students than ever before. One of the outstanding evidences of this feeling of world- 
fellowship has been the support of a missionary, an honor which G. C. W. claims for the 
first time in her eventful history. We are now represented in China by Miss Zung We 
Tsung, a former student of this college and one who merits the highest praise that tongue 
can utter. 

Again, our Association has been very active in work done among the poor and friend- 
less. During the Thanksgiving and Christmas seasons, as well as other times during the 
year, we truly experienced the joy of giving to those less fortunate than we, for it was 
our privilege and pleasure to bring some joy and sunshine into their darkened lives. 

It has been the purpose of the Association to secure the best of speakers for our 
meetings in order that the best of inspiration might come to its members. Among the 
many welcome visitors to our College, we remember especially Madame Bernard, Miss 
Katherine Hawes, Miss Helen Hardy, and Dr. C. G Hounshell. These people brought 
something worth while into our lives. 

The Y. W. C. A. has tried to enter into all phases of college life, to help bear the 
daily burdens, and to light the way over difficult places. It has worked that every girl 
may possess the Life Abundant, but time alone can mark the success or failure of its 
efforts. 



(171) 



A Word From the Student Council 

HIS has been the brightest year in the Student Govern- 

)Jk) ment Association. Since 1916, when the honor system 

was established, there has been an intensified growth in 

S^^^g^sji individual responsibility and this year has been marked by 

few restnctions. 

Aside from local affairs, the meeting of the Southern Intercollegiate 
Association of Student Government stands out. In the spring of 1919 
this Association held its session at Hollins College, our representatives 
being Nell Davis and Annie Laurie Lourance. This year the Associa- 
tion met in Greensboro, with North Carolina College for Women and our 
college as joint hostesses. It was our privilege, among other things, to 
entertain the delegates at a tea at the O. Henry Hotel. 

As we look back over the past year, we rejoice over the success with 
which our efforts have met; we appreciate the enthusiasm that every girl 
has manifested in upholding our ideal ; we appreciate the support and 
co-operation of the faculty; and with apologies for all the mistakes we 
have made, we submit the trust which we have had into the hands of 
the new Council. May they see the possibilities ahead of them; may 
they feel and know that they are supported by a body of the most loyal 



(172) 



From the Land of the Little Japanee 
Alta Debnam 

The Girl of Sunny Italy 
Ida Sledge 

The Maid of Merrie England 
Mary Lillian Sink 

The Girl of Fair France 
Aileen Aiken 

The American Girl — "Maid" in the U. S. A. 
Christine Walker 

Here's to 
Japan 
Italy 

England 
France 

America 



To ow Allied Nations, our 
Comrades-in-Arms, to Tvhom n>e 
have been more closely drawn 
through rear's grim circumstances 
and story, v>e dedicate these pages. 




FROM THE LAND OF THE LITTLE JAPANEE 



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THE GIRL OF SUNNY ITALY 



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MAID OF MERRIE ENGLAND 




THE GIRL OF FAIR FRANCE 




THE AMERICAN GIRL "MAID" IN THE U. S. A 







<Co the Classes of 1917, 1918 
and 1919 



To you, oh, older Sisters, 

who left us lo uphold the standards of C. C. W ., 

because your acquaintance 

and friendships have 

helped us along many a rugged path, 

and your memory 

has lighted many a dreary hour, 

and because rue are still so vitally interested in you, 

we dedicate the following pages. 










- ;.::z;-z >E 
Class of ' 1 7 Roll Call 

N the glorious day of June, 1917, when our Class of twenty-one girls, 
full of hope and joy of living, left this dear old college home, little did 
we dream what would come to us in three years. In the loss of one of 
our number, who gave her life in helping others, we have been drawn 
closer together. Louise Franklin in her death has given us the true meaning 
of service — she has lifted our ideals to a higher plane — she has ennobled our thoughts and 
enriched our lives. 

We find in some cases that there is a great difference in what we were to be and 
what we are. 

TEMPERANCE AYCOCK, of Pantego, N. C, still believes that to be in love is a 
blissful state, and still wonders how women can be such ardent suffragists when there 
are such wonderful men in the world. 

RUTH BARDEN PlPPIN, formerly of Goldsboro, N. C, who used to be so fond 
of mathematics, has given up the idea of teaching this subject to begin the profession of 
home making in Fremont, N. C. 

Sarah Lee Brock and Letha Brock, of Richlands, N. C, are still preparing 
to be "The World's Famous Toe Dancers" — although they have deviated somewhat 
from the path. 

GAYNELLE CALLOWAY, of Mt. Airy, N. C, instead of thrilling vast audiences 
with her power of song, has decided to teach the youth of the land. 

Myrtle Bruton Fitzgerald, formerly of Biscoe, N. C, who was destined to 
lose her power of reasoning because of too eager aspirations of musical fame, has taken 
unto herself a partner so that she may not forget the rules of harmony. 

SALLIE Ruth CHAPPELL, of Edenton, N. C, has given up the idea of being Miss 
Calloway's accompanist for the more delightful role of a Prima Donna. All Edenton 
is continually thrilled by her melodious voice. 

LILLIAN COZART, of Stem, N. C, has found that "The Educational World" is 
entirely too slow for her and she finds in "The Business World" a greater opportunity' 
for observing punctuality. 

FRANCES FARRELL, of Leaksville, N. C, has been drawn aside from her life calling 
— "Editor of the Daily News" — to help Uncle Sam in adjusting the affairs of the 
nation — believing in doing so she will be a world benefactress. 

Ila Harrell, of Gates, N. C, has forsaken the hope of being a stump speaker, 
and desires to devote her time exclusively to the problems of the Methodist Parsonage. 

ELEANOR HoRTON, of Wadesboro, N. C, ardently believing that teaching expres- 
sion would be too confining, has taken up banking. Much to her surprise she finds that 
holidays are not so abundant as she had hoped for. 

ELLEN Jones, of Hillsboro, N. C, has abandoned her calling of selling hair dyes 
to take up the more lucrative profession of teaching. 

EDELWEISS KING, of Wilmington, N. C, has defied fate, in that she prefers to train 
minds with reasoning rather than without. 

GRACE OSBORNE, of Durham, N. C, is now planning to carry out that long 
cherished hope of hers — after the ceremony she will reside in Durham as prophesied. 

Rena Perry, of Duke, N. C, formerly known as "policeman," is exercising that 
authority most vigorously in behalf of her pupils and fellow teachers. 

(180) 




The Class of 1917 



\m 



BESSIE Pulliam, of Alton, Va., who was foretold to be the artist of the class, 
has given up the idea of using the brush, preferring rather to paint word pictures. 

MlGNON SMITH is carrying out her dearest wish of being a model, but in quiet 
ways, and is now devoting her time and wit in entertaining soldiers. 

Eastport, N. Y., is a thing of the past. MARGUERITE Tuthill's guiding star 
of destiny at present is standing still over G. C. W. Fate has decreed that this is one 
of the stationary stars, thus proving that she shall be one of the "Land Marks." 

GRACE WALLACE TAYLOR, of Morehead City, N. C, has long since abandoned 
the idea of being a missionary in India and prefers to devote her time exclusively to 
Morehead City and its inmates. Her domestic tastes have led her into the home field. 

We TsUNG ZuNG, of Soo Chow, China, after remaining at Smith College two 
years, has returned to her native country to help promote the idea of higher education in 
China. She is now representing G. C. W. as her missionary in the foreign field. 







(182) 



Class of '18 Roll Call 




INCE the spring of 1918 when we, the Class of '18, left our college 
home, vast realms of work have been opened to us; and by the following 
class roll of ' 1 8 you can see into what realm each one of us has entered : 

REUBE ALLEY — Although still living on "the college hill," and 
using her influence for the betterment of athletics there, Rube is Tech- 
nician for the Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Company, Greensboro, North Carolina. 

MAURINE BRITTAIN — Making good use of both her A. B. and B. M. degrees by 
teaching voice and grade work at Parkton, North Carolina. 

KATHLEEN CONROY — Teaching somewhere in Alabama. 

MYRTLE CAVENESS — Myrtle is also teaching, but we have not been able to find ou l 
where she is teaching. 

THELMA DlXON — Better known as "Y. W." because of her active work in the 
Y. W. C. A. in Greensboro College for Women, is now teaching at Zebulon, North 
Carolina, and is perhaps imparting to her children not only her knowledge of books but 
of Y. W. C. A. work as well. 

ELIZABETH DERICKSON — Elizabeth has dipped into the future a little deeper than 
her other classmates. She is now Mrs. R. J. Spearman, of Lynchburg, Va. 

MlNNIE GARRETT — Teaching Domestic Science in Rockingham, N. C. 

THELMA HARRELL — How we envy her, because she is still living within the 
college walls of her dear Alma Mater, no longer as a student, but as the accompanist of 
Mr. Benj. S. Bates, voice teacher. 

CLAIRE HARRIS — Teaching in the High School in Norwood, N. C. 

CATHERINE HUBBARD — Although Catherine is taking a "breathing spell" this 
year by staying at home, she has not forgotten her power as a poetess. 

ANNIE LONG — Annie has followed in the footsteps of her classmate, Elizabeth 
Derickson, for she is now Mrs. Ramsey Buchannan. 

ELIZABETH MERRITT— 'Elizabeth, too, is staying at home this year, but this does 
not mean that she is idle, for by staying at home, she is learning a lesson in Home 
Economics. 

MATTIE REGI3TER — Teaching grade work in Greensboro, N. C. 

SADYE TROLLINGER — Sadye, after one year's training at Peabody Conservatory 
in Baltimore, Md., is now teaching music in the High School in Cary, North Carolina. 

MARGUERITE WlLSON — Teaching at her home in Woodville, North Carolina. 

JESSIE REEVES — Teaching school in Morven, North Carolina. 



(183) 






Class Song of '18 



Words by Ruben Alley 
Music by Thelma Harrell 

Class of Nineteen Eighteen — eighteen strong we stand; 
Looking to the future, marching hand in hand. 
As the days are passing we will strive to give 
The spirit of our motto "While we're living — live." 

Within thine ivy-colored walls, 

G. C, whom we love, 
Within thy memory-crowded halls 

Our ideals soar above 
And throughout all eternity, 

G. C., we'll turn to thee 
And through all the days may we 
Ever give praise of thee, 

O, dear Eighteen! 

Loyalty to college, loyalty to land. 

Faithfulness to duty for all this we stand. 

To our Alma Mater — we will strive to be 

Truest of thy daughters that have gone from thee. 



(184) 



' 



HUE 



Class of ' 1 9 Roll Call 




OTHER TIME has made rapid strides and wrought many changes since June, 1919. 
It seems aeons and aeons ago since the last roll call of the Class of '19 on that 
memorable Senior Class Day. On that day we stood in solemn array, striving to 
uphold the dignity and honor of our newly-acquired caps and gowns. Now send 
forth the call once more, and let us sec how the Class of '19 is striving not only to 
uphold G. C.'s high ideals but to instill them in the youthful hearts and minds of 
Today's children. 

Miss Agnes Chasten — First and foremost of all ; we are so glad to know that she is in her old 
place waiting to give of a cheery welcome when we visit our Alma Mater. 

David NICHOLSON, Jr. — The little mascot of the Class of '19 continues to scatter sunshine all 
along College Place. 

Esther AycOCK — Teaching English and Mathematics in Belmont High School, and in all 
probability giving private lessons in "sass." 

Gaynelle Barnes — Teaching at Lumber Bridge not far from her home; she seems to be enjoying 
life there. 

Ruth Bell — Teaching a "Huckleberry Finn" set of boys in her home town, Belhaven — boys who 
probably take advantage of Ruth's inclination to sleep while holding study periods. 

MauRINE BritTAIN — Our musical Kewpie is endeavoring to impart her knowledge of trills and 
melodies to five voice students at Parkton — to say nothing of her grammar school class of thirty-eight 
children. 

Lucy BROTHERS — Teaching a little bit of everything to the children near her home (about six 
miles from La Grange). We hope she is preparing them for useful citizenship as active Y. M. and 
Y. W. C. A. workers. 

Edna CavINESS — Rumor has it that Edna is teaching in Asheboro — but she must be trying to 
keep it a secret ; we have been unable to secure details. 

FLOSSIE Denny — Teaching the fourth grade of Pomona Grammar School. How we envy Flossie 
living, as it were, in the very shadow of our Alma Mater. 

CARRIE Erwin — If numbers count for merit, then Carrie with her 89 pupils at Trinity, N. C, 
outshines us all. 

ELIZABETH GlBSON — Teaching at Grifton, N. C, and in all probability acting as treasurer of all 
the firms and organizations in that town. 

Nell GrOOME — For the time being, Nell is teaching music in the High School of Matthews, N. C. 
Knowing Nell, we prophesy a wedding invitation from her in short order. 

Carrie Harris — Dispenser of sparkling diamonds and sparkling glances across the counter of 
Oxford Jewelry Co. 



Anna Holshouser — Teaching a fine set of little third grade tots at her home, Salisbury. 
Myrtie Humble — Teaching with Lucy near La Grange — teaching "everything to all kinds 



of 



children in every grade," so Myrtie says. 

Kate HuttoN — Teaching the second grade on West Lee Street, only a short dislance from G. C. 
We would like to have her location, if not her "job." 

Attrice Kernodle — At Smith College. And guess what! Attrice entered with 62 hours 
credit, and Smith requires only 64 for graduation. So Attrice is working for an M. A. Isn't tnat a 
booster for the Class of 1919 and for G. C. W. 

Ernestine Lambeth — "Mr. and Mrs. John Walter Lambeth request the honor of your presence 
at the marriage of their daughter, Daisy Ernestine, to Mr. Thomas Austin Finch on Thursday, the sixth 
of November, at eight o'clock in the evening, at the Main Street Methodist Church, Thomasville, North 
Carolina." This needs no explanation! 

Martha Moore — Teaching or married? We cannot discover which. P. S. — Married. 
Jessie Pillow — Our business lady is working at the Southern Life and Trust Co. 

(186) 




The Class of 1919 




LlLLIE Gay Shaw — Teaching the sixth grade in Weldon, and inspiring her youngsters to brave 
attempts in rhyming. 

Mary Exum Snow — Historian of Watts Hospital, West Durham. 

Verdiel Trollinger — Teaching French and Histoiy in the Belmont High School, and likes it fine. 
Of course she does, because Esther is her constant companion as of yore. 

Gladys Whedbee — Teaching the seventh grade at Bailey, N. C, and having a wonderful time 
along social lines. 

Ammie Wilson — Teaching Home Economics in Lillington Farm Life School, and of course 
Ammie is bound to mate a success. 

Marjorie Worsham — Teaching music at Bailey, N. C. A little bird told us a secret about 
Marjorie, but we can't tell it now! 

Does it seem possible that twelve months could scatter us like this, and does it seem that we are 
forever disunited? Let us assure you that the Class of '19 will ever be united in love and loyalty 
to our Alma Mater. 



Senior Class Roll 1 920 



Martha Bridesmaid Adams 
Elizabeth Presidinc-Elder Austin 
Myrtle "I Firm" Barnes 
Bessie Whistling Buckner 
Elizabeth "Dated-up" Cox 
Mary Lily Night- Hawk Cox 
Louise Domestic Science Davis 
Nell Wants-to-Get-Married Davis 
Erdene Rocking-Chair Denning 
Blanche Stringer Erwin 
Louise Mayonaise Elliott 
Louise Wink-the-Lichts Foy 
Annie Dramatic Griffin 
Mary Louise Sentimental Harrell 
Annie Special Delivery Harris 



Naomi Speed Walker Howie 

Sallie Cornet Holt 

Lucile "(?)" Morris 

Martha Evelyn Cutex Morris 

Carrie Take-'Em-Off McNeely 

Nellie Fraternity Muse 

Bernice Fresh-Air Nicholson 

May Big-hearted Robinson 

Madge Got-An-Idea Sills 

Ineze Wants-to-be-in-a- Wedding Smithwick 

Kate D. M. Warlick 

Mary Candy W>lson 

Nellie Apples White 

Mabel Fried Young 

Marie Matrimony Young 



(IS?) 




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BOOK VI 




College 
Publications 



The Echo 

Published annually by the Students' Association 

The Message 

Published bi-monthly* by the two Literary* Societies 









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(192) 












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Echo Staff 

Mary Lily Cox Editor-in-Chief 

Marie Young Associate Editor 

Marceret Martin Associate Editor 

Elizabeth Austin Business Manager 

Nellie Muse Assistant Business Manager 

LuciLE Johnson Assistant Business Manager 

Odelle Peacock Assistant Business Manager 

Ineze SmIIHWICK Photograph Editor 

Louise Foy Assistant Photograph Editor 

Louise Elliott Assistant Photogrcph Editor 

Mary Frances Rankin Art Editor 

Emma Bailey Assistant Art Editor 

Martha Adams Literary Editor 

Madge Sills Assistant Literary Editor 

Kate Warlick Athletic Editor 

LuciLE Morris Assistant Athletic Editor 

Rachel May Taylor Dramatic Editor 

Ruth Balsam Humor Editor 

Evelyn Burton Humor Editor 




JMMiMmwSlth 






(193) 




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(194) 



Editorial Staff of the College Message 

Mary Louise Harrell Edilor-in-Chief 

Sadie Jenkins Assistant Editor 

Hazel CarlYLE Business Manager 

LOUISE Davis Assistant Business Manager 

Ethel Von Cannon Exchange Editor 

Odelle Peacock Exchange Editor 

Edith Ader Local Editor 

Ursula Boyd Local Editor 

Bessie Clarke Y. W. C. A. Editor 

Ethel Bost Y. W. C. A. Editor 

Ruth Balsam Athletic Editor 

Winifred Sundean Athletic Editor 

Kate Warlick Humor Editor 

Carrie McNeely Humor Editor 

Nellie Muse Dramatic Editor 




(195) 




M. Adams says "I've a monopoly on 

duties." 
But we think instead 'tis on American 

Beauties. 

There are toasts to the liberal and 

toasts to the miser, 
But here's to "Liz" Austin, our class 

advertiser. 

Oh, Mytle has plenty of sense in her 

"dome" 
Until it comes to studying — then 

"there's nobody home." 

Some girls can whistle and some girls 

can dance, 
But Bess Buckner can sing you into 

a trance. 

"Liz" Cox says a lion is a insig- 
nificant thing 
When a slick little mouse enters the 
ring. 

There are bells that we love and bells 

that we hate, 
But the light bell, says Mary Lily, is 

the worst one of fate. 






(196) 















mm 












Nell Davis, our Student President, is 
neither dignified nor bold, 

But the way she can preside is great 
to behold. 

There are many who aspire to po- 
litical fame, 

But compared to good housekeeping, 
Louise thinks that is tame. 

Here's to E. Denning, who rocks bv 

the day 
As if she were really expecting great 

Pay- 
Music, like Mendelssohn, many would 

write, 
But compared to Louise, all fade out 

of sight. 

There are those, who ensemble, wear 
frat pins and rings, 

But only our Blanche can use twenty- 
five strings. 

Louise Foy can't waltz and she can't 

one-step, 
But when it comes to clogging — who 

has a better rep? 




(197) 












3 QBE 







Some girls, you know, are very em- 
phatic, 

But not so our Annie, she's just plain 
dramatic. 

Annie Harris says, ""Tis strange girls 

like to roam. 
Every time, give me my own Home, 

Sweet Home." 

Oh, some girls can do, and some can 

dream dreams, 
But Mary Louise Harrell can "go on" 

to correct themes. 

There's the music of the bee and the 

music of the hornet, 
But no music on earth like Sallie 

Holt's cornet. 

Some things, they say, are not what 

they seem, 
But for unsophistication, Naomi Howie 

is a scream. 

Martha Evelyn can sing and Martha 

Evelyn can root, 
But primping, they say, is her chief 

long suit. 



(198) 



The best athlete who has been here in 

years 
Is "Freshie" Morris — for her three 

cheers. 

There are a good many sports in our 

Senior band, 
But Nellie Muse is our biggest "ladies' 

man." 

Carrie McNeeley cannot play music or 

rook, 
But oh, young men, how she can cook! 

Fresh air! Fresh air! cries our 

Bernice, 
And 'till you've raised all the windows 

you know no peace. 

A trip down town May Robinson 

spurns, 
And strangely her steps towards the 

Normal turns. 

Madge is the statesman of our thirty 

and one, 
And some day for Congress we expect 

her to run. 




(199) 




Ineze can dance and Ineze can walk, 
But there's nothing to compare with 
how Ineze can talk. 

Some day, we think, in the literary 

world, 
Ethel Von Cannon will create a big 

whirl. 

Pretty nails and teeth may help out 

fate, 
And pretty hair too, says our bonny 

Kate. 

Some girls are stout and some girls 

are lean, 
But Nellie White's the quietest you 

ever have seen. 

A basketball player, some think they 
have seen, 

But wait 'till you see Mabel — a reg- 
ular queen. 

Mary Wilson is bashful, some folks 

say; 
Just wait 'till you see her on a carefree 

day. 

And now we end with the luckiest of 

our class — 
Marie Young — may her happiness 

always last. 



(200) 



ffiolfc 



Aw! Quit Now 



ADVICE TO NEXT YEAR'S JOKE EDITORS 

1. Don't take the job at all. 

2. Employ a company of stenographers. 

3. Find a secluded place in which to work. 

4. Have all contributions written on tissue paper, so that the editors can see 
through them. 

5. Leave town immediately after publication of Annual. 

DORMITORY DICTIONARY 

Art — Supposed to be a three hours' course. Old — Every joke is. 

Bluff — Ask Nellie Muse. Potatoes — Sweet, Irish, and otherwise. 

Crime — Studying. Quiz — A teacher's revenge. 

Dutch — Frequent treat at school. Rats — A hair dresser's camouflage. 

£ — Popular after exams. Studies — Equal to X — unknown quantity. 

Freshman — Impossible to define. Eighty- Temptation — Movies. 

eight varieties. Useless — To argue with Miss Ricketts. 

Guessing — Your last resort in class. Vaccinate — A process of inoculating 

Harmless — Bones of a class. pupils with brains — not effective. 

Intelligence — Synonymous with ignorance. Wishbone — Student's head. 

]o\e — Sarah Carlyle's hobby. Xcitement- — Always welcome during 

Kuriosity — Freshie knows. class. 

Lie — Unnecessary assistant ; fib just as Yesterday- — Another day off the calendar 

good. until commencement. 

Mail — (male) Scarce. Zero — Common on scholastic ther- 

Necessary — Sleep. mometer. 

i{. rfc rf. 

PLEASANT SURPRISES 
W-H-E-N you get a box from home. 

W-H-E-N you succeed in covering a grease spot with a rug. 
W-H-E-N someone returns to you the loaned money which you never expected to 

see again. 
W-H-E-N we have pie twice in succession. 
W-H-E-N announcements are not made in the dining-room. 
W-H-E-N a teacher forgets to assign a lesson. 
W-H-E-N a teacher is sixteen minutes late. 
W-H-E-N someone brings you a ham sandwich for breakfast. 
W-H-E-N it rains on Sunday morning. 

W-H-E-N something besides your roommate's mail is in your box. 
W-H-E-N the privilege is given you to go to the movies unchaperoned. 

(201) 










mm^ 















SOPHISTICATED G. C. W. DELEGATES AT DES MOINES 
Visiting places of interest in Chicago, Miss Brock asked as they entered the Uni- 
versity gate: "Oh, are these the stock yards?" 

Emma Bailey, looking at two deaconesses in uniform, said: "If Miss Ricketts were 
to come to a conference like this, would she have to wear a uniform like that?" 

Naomi made a great impression at the conference — going home one night, she made 
two hits on the ice. 

In first session of the conference, Miss Brock was asked where she was from. 

Miss Brock: '"Greensboro College for Women." 

Blank faces! 

Ethel (shyly) : "North Carolina." 

Naomi upon seeing several V. M. I. cadets, exclaimed: "Don't the policemen here 

wear pretty uniforms!" 

* * * 

THINGS EASY TO REMEMBER: 

Christmas vacation. 



Your latest love. 
Time to leave class. 
Parlor dates. 

Sf, !fi Sfc 

THINGS EASY TO FORGET: 

Rules and regulations. 

Where tne lesson is. 

Borrowed theme paper. 

English memory work. 

Wooly's handbook. 

Money you owe. 

Theme conferences. 

Chemistry aprons. 

Parallel reading. 

Daily exercise. 

Reason for going down town. 

Specials to be mailed down street. 



INSEPARABLES: 

Kate Warlick and her white oxfords. 
Odelle and her soldier dress. 
Jeannetle Davis and her "specials." 
Helen Reynolds and her singing. 
M. Harper and E. Cox. 
Madge and her ideas. 
Breakfast and "hurry." 
Sunday dinner and ice cream. 
Sunday nights and paper bags. 
I. Edgerton and her chewing gum. 
Mabel Young and Lois Frye. 
Miss Ricketts and her system. 
Dr. Turrentine and his itineraries. 
Ruth Fulton and her crushes. 
Aleph Jones and her fancy work. 
Kitchenettes and broken irons. 
Bulletin boards and important notices. 
Chapel addresses and passing trains. 






Margaret Taylor, entering music store and hearing last part of piece: "What 
are you playing?" 

Man (looking up) : "All I want is a girl like you." 

Vera Pullen to Lorraine: "Who is Alma Mater?" 

(202) 















UNINTENTIONAL WIT 






One morning as Edna was dusting, she picked up John's picture, and as she was 
just in the act of pressing it to her lips, Martha Lee entered, singing, "Yield not to 
temptation." 

Dr. Turrentine, during Bible class: "Following Abraham in the line of Patriarchal 
fathers we have — Miss Rose Jones." 

Katherine Walker (following the announcement of a Volunteer Band meeting) : "Miss 
Pegram, does that mean the String Band?" 

Alberta Fuller: "I wonder if Dr. Turrentine will meet his Bible class today?" 

B. Erwin: "Yes, if he isn't on an itinerary." 

A. F. : "Goodness, you don't mean to say that man gets drunk?" 

Two men, approaching the rotunda porch, asked: "How can we get in touch with 
the head physician?" 

Student: "We have none." 

Men: "Isn't this Keely's institute?" 

Ruby Fuller: "I know you didn't get that 'frat' pin from .A. and E. because 
Sigma Chi is at Trinity." 

Mildred Perkins and Carrie A. Mann in kitchenette. Hazel Carlyle enters and they 
ask why the candy won't "work." 

Hazel: "Where are the matches?" 
The cooks (thoroughly surprised) : "Land sakes, do you have to light it?" 

Mot: "Did you know Galli-Curci was divorced last week?" 
M. L. C. : "Gracious, no; from whom?" 
Mot: "Her husband." 

New girl, complaining of exams, asks: "What would you do if you were in my 
shoes?" 

S. Carlyle: "I'd polish them." 

Miss Ward to Miss Russell : Will you give Milton s Sonnet on His Blindness ? 
That's correct. Now Miss Richardson, will you give it?" 
Miss R. : "I ditto what Miss Russell said." 

Mattie Lou: "Oh, look at my pretty 'morsage.' " 

L. Straughan: "Oh, look at mine. It is already arranged and has ribbonon it." 

Helen Hurley (disgustedly) : "My evening dress has a perfect 'menu' for staying 
on the floor." 

Freshman, looking at fire extinguishers on third floor: '"I wonder when we will 
get to use those life preservers." 

(203) 



Mr. Hurley: "Who was Venus?" (Much hesitation on part of Soph) — "Often 
used in alluding to women." 

Billie Woodard: "Goddess of War." 

Ethel Von: "What are the Bolsheviki?" 

Carrie Mc: "Why, haven't you heard of them?" 

Ethel: "No, I never studied Greek." 

Literary Society Pres. : "What is the commotion?" 

Student: "She wants to make a motion, but her dress is stuck to the chair." 
Miss Weber: "Yes, we have had Catholicism, Puritanism, and all the other 'isms' 
brought to America." 

Treva: "How about rheumatism?" 

Orpa Steed: "My mother is coming to see me; I wonder if it would be better for 
her to stay at the O. Henry or the Hennessee." 

E. Denning: "Why are the summers longer than the winters?" 
Mr. N. : "Because heat expands and cold contracts." 

"The Life Savers Band will meet in 1 1 immediately after dinner." 

Aldyth Wilson: "Evidently we are going to have our swimming pool right away." 

Miss Clark: "Name the important revolutions of the 19th century." 
Odelle Peacock: "The American Revolution." 

Mr. Hurley: "Miss Sheek, name one of Shakespeare's sonnets." 
Miss Sheek: "Milton's Sonnet on His Blindness." 
Dr. Turrentine: "Describe the burial of Moses." 

Florence Adams: "He had a very elaborate burial and all the tribes came to his 
funeral." 

Esther Newberry (in history) : "King Alfred was a statesman, lawgiver, and a 
fiance." 

Miss Pegram: "Why do you not have your trigonometry today?" 
Grace Harper: "I had a sore arm and could not handle the logs." 

Mary Ring: "How long was the Hundred Years' War?" 
Katherine Pickett: "I don't know." 

Lilly Kyle (seriously studying Bible) : ' 'He rested on the seventh day.' He must 
not have had any English parallel!" 

Miss Clarke on History II: "Miss Taylor, who was William Pitt?" 
Miss Taylor (with a bright look) : "Oh, he was the man who had the apple shot 
off his head." 

In English: "Who was Florence Nightingale?" 
Elizabeth Reed: "A great singer." 

(204) 









Katharine Bacon (after fire drill) : "Why did you close the windows?" 
Norma Partin (seriously) : "To keep the fire from going outside." 

Ragtime Lyceum artist, ragging informally after his recital: "And now what do 
you want next?" 

Martha Evelyn Morris: "Kiss me again." 

Irene Robinson (studying Appreciation) : "It says here the flute was the oldest 
instrument, but I think the drum is, because I believe the savages' first intention was to 
beat time." 

Nina Hickman: "No, they got the idea for the flute from the wind whistling over 
the telegraph wires." 

Mr. Hurley, giving out parts in "As You Like It," speaking to Miss Cole: "Are you 
anybody?" 

Miss Cole (weakly) : "No, sir." 

Mr. H. : "Well, take your usual part — the clown." 

Helen Leslie: "Miss Pegram, where are you from?" 

Miss P.: "Durham." 

Helen: "Is that the place where tobacco grows?" 

Miss Weber (in History class) : "Where did our first horses come from?" 
Marguerite Ring: "Kentucky." 



Kate Warlick (studying French) 
M. L. Harrell: "Masculine." 
K. W. : "Oh, yes, mail train." 



"What is the gender of train?" 



Nu Eta 
(Night Hawks) 
Mary Lily Cox 
Freshie Morris 
Ineze Smithwick 
Myrtle Barnes 
Elizabeth Cox 



Sfi Sfi Sfi 

SORORITIES 
Nu Kappa Omega 

(Nightingale Club) (The Zoo) 

Helen Reynolds Annie Griffin 

Bessie Buckner Elizabeth Cox 

Mattie Lou Russell Egletine Merritt 

Eula Maie Farmer Ruth Fulton 

Sadye Jenkins Lenna Newton 

Helen Morton Mary Hudgins 
Cara Wren 

SOPHOMORE CHEMISTRY FUMES 
A green little upstart in a green little way, 
Some chemicals mixed just for fun one day. 
Now the green little grasses tenderly wave 
O'er the green little upstart's green little grave. 

Selected 
(205) 



Tau Kappa 
(Time Killers) 
Aleph Jones 
Myrtle Barnes 
Marie Gregson 
Inez Edgerton 
Elva Sheek 
Lorraine Burgess 



SAY 



When you've 

Had hash for 

Breakfast and 

Beans for lunch 

And 

Weinies for supper 

And no 

Mail three times 

And Miss Ricketts has 

Called you 

Up for 

Skipping 

Chapel and you were 

Sat on three 

Times on classes 

For not 

Answering 

Questions you knew 

By heart 

And Miss Hamilton wouldn't 

Let 

You have the 

Key to open your 

Door that the 

Wind blew shut and 

You had 



Stumped your toe 

And almost 

Fallen down stairs 

Before the 

English Professor 

And 

You had 

Hunted Thomas two 

Hours straight to 

Fix your 

Leaking radiator 

And 

Finally you had gone 

Home to 

Cry yourself to 

Death on the 
Bed— 

And then 

Returning home you had 

Found on your bed a 

Special from 

John 

Awaiting you — 
Oh, girls, AIN'T it 

A GRRRAND AND GLORR- 
RIOUS FEELING! 



* * 



Editor's Note: If anything on these highbrow pages tear your disposition particle from 
particle— BLAME THE PRINTER!— he done it! 




(206) 



Forty-One 
College Annuals 

Representing Colleges in Seventeen 

States is Our Record for 

This Season 



Benson Printing Company is a printing plant specially 
equipped for every kind of school and college work. It is a 
complete organization with artists and designersand work- 
men whose thought and inspiration is concentrated in the 
production of College Annuals and School Literature. 

This vear we are printing for such institutions as: Georgetown Col'ege, 
Alabama Woman's College, Millsaps College, Wofford College, Brenau 
College, Mercer University, Judson College, University of Alabama, 
Transylvania College, Kentucky College for Women, Tennessee College, 
Greensboro Woman's College, Trimble County High School, Sewanee 
University, Greenville Woman's College, Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 
Tulane University, Kentucky State University, Belhaven College, Se- 
wanee Military Academy, Dickinson College, Blue Mountain College, 
Muskingum College, University of Mississippi, Ouachita College, Furman 
University, Mississippi Woman's College, Hillman College, Branham and 
Hughes Militprv Academy, Davidson College. Birmingham Southern 
College, The Citadel, Henderson-Brown College, Westhampton College, 
Trinity College, Central College, State Normal School, Alabama Presbyte- 
rian College, Central High School, Vanderbilt University, Howard College. 



Samples and Prices 
Upon Request 




College Annual 
Experts 



^his Book is a Sample oj Our Work 




ff&r 



Iahn ^Ollier 

^ENGRAVING COMPANV"V 



'winners cmc/ Lhgrar&rs 
"ANNUALS ^ ^ 







n 






aaenr of~ 



•ations. Designs 
graphs " 






Illustra 
Photo/ 

Half-tones, Line *w* 
BenDai/ Zinc Etchings 
Three m Four Color 
Process Plates- 



ZTa'dBlast Quality 

^ffain Office and P/an-i f-t /*"»u t /-** A /"» r~\JlflaTtta-Davenbprt-7(iznsasCfu 
554- W^ic/ams Sfreef^-M \^j tl 1 0/\0 L-J Jiilu/aukee-SouthBend-Toledo 



z;;;;;;;;;xi:;^.;;.-;:;;,;;: 




BIJOU THEATRE 

"ALWAYS WORTH WHILE" 

PARAMOUNT PICTURES 
ARTCRAFT PICTURES 



MAKE THIS THEATER YOUR THEATER 



HARVEY E. 
CLINE 







GRADUATE 
PHARMACIST 







Greensboro, N. C. 



BROADWAY 
CAFE 

The Most Sanitary 

Eating Place 

In Town 

Opposite Post Office 
Demetrehs Bros. 

Proprietors 



THE QUALITY SHOP 

M. G. FRASER, Manager 

Ladies' Ready-to- Wear 

Beautiful Models for 1920 Are Now Ready for Your Selection. The 

Opportunity Is Here to Chose Your Spring Suit, 

Coat or Dress. 

WE HAVE MADE CAREFUL 
PREPARATIONS FOR THIS EVENT 

A Full Stock of Well-Known Garments Of Quality 
Are On Display 

Ten Per Cent Off for College Students 
222 South Elm Street GREENSBORO, N. C. 



OFTEN THE CAUSE OF WANT IN OLD AGE IS WANT OF 
THRIFT IN YOUTH 



GREENSBORO LOAN & TRUST CO. 



-RESOURCES- 



$2,700,000.00 



J. W. Fry President 

J. S. Cox Vice-President 

W. E. Allen Secretary and Treasurer 

W. M. Ridenhour Assistant Secretary and Treasurer 



RED CROSS 
SHOES 

The Most Stylish Shoe In America. 

The Choice of College 

Women 

THE PRICES 

You'll Be Surprised to Know How 
Reasonable They Are 

BROWN-LYNDON 
SHOE CO. 

1 1 4 West Market 
"The Shoe Without the Hurt" 



HOWERTON'S 
DRUG STORE 

PRESCRIPTION 
DRUGGISTS 

AGENTS FOR 

NORRIS CANDY 

Telephones 46 and 47 

PROMPT DELIVERY 

Guilford Hotel Corner 



SOLID, SOUND 




SUCCESSFUL 



Three Years Ago the Southern Life and Trust Company 

Had $1 7,000,000 of Life Insurance in Force. 

It Now Has Over $40,000,000 

THE BUSINESS MORE THAN DOUBLED 
IN THREE YEARS 

Southern Life and Trust Company 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

A. W. McAllister... ....Pres. R. G. Vaughn ....1st V.-Pres. 

A. M. Scales 2d V.-Pres. R. J. Mebane 3d V.-Pres. 

ARTHUR WATT, Secretary 



SHIFFMAN JEWELRY COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS OF 
COLLEGE JEWELRY 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Quality Counts 

Do not buy cheap Shoes this spring 
just because good footwear costs a 
little more than you have been ac- 
customed to paying. 

It Is Not Economy 

One good pair of Shoes will out- 
wear two pairs of inferior quality 
and retain their shape throughout 
long service. You'll have to pay 
more for Shoes whichever way you 
figure, and one pair of good Shoes 
is actually cheaper than two pairs of 
cheap ones. Considered from the 
point of economy it is far better for 
you to Buy Good Shoes. 

DOBSON-SILLS 

Every Inch a Shoe Store 
Greensboro and Winston-Salem 



Ellis, Stone & 
Company 

A Store Dedicated To 

Women's Service 

First of All 

In the search for the "New and 
Beautiful" for each coming season; 
in appointment of the store in its en- 
tirety ; in real service that must mean 
absolute satisfaction, this store is at 
all times the Store First Of All For 
Women. 

"The House of Quality" 

Ellis, Stone & Company 



Since You Must Pay More 

For Most Everything 

You Buy 

You will find it The Part Of 
Economy and Thorough Sat- 
isfaction to Purchase the Very 
Best Qualities 



If you have decided to have only one 
suit or dress or one hat this season 
instead of two or more as heretofore, 
and this by reason of higher costs — then 
by all means see to it that that one suit 
or dress or hat, as the case may be, 
contains the best fashion features and 
material that will wear. 




WE GIVE TRADING STAMPS < 

5) 




JDEPARTAENTSTOReQ/creens 



GREENSBORO'S MAIN 

DRUG STORE 

The Store That Appreciates 

Your Business Is 

FARRIS-KLUTZ 
DRUG STORE 

If It Is Kept In Any Drug Store 

They Have It, and the Price 

Is Never Too High 



"On the Square" You Will Find 

GREENSBORO 
DRUG CO. 

Where every customer gets what she 
wants. They carry the best assort- 
ment of Toilet Articles in the city, 
and their fountain drinks and ice 
cream cannot be surpassed. 



R. C. BERNAU 

THE POPULAR 
JEWELER 

If 



CLASS RINGS, PINS AND 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

MADE TO ORDER 

Greensboro, N. C. 



Guilford Insurance & 
Realty Company 

REAL ESTATE LOANS 
AND INSURANCE 

O. L. GRUBBS, President 
A. K. Moore, Sec. and Treas. 

109 East Market Street 

Greensboro, N. C. 



133HXS 13>Ia"Vl/\[ 1S3^ 501 

jaujo^) 
sip punojy 3Jo}g 3\w-[ 3u_j uj 

H1HOMAVH 'A '/A 

a-vea"] }snf AjpMsf jo aui^[ ai]} uj 
SuiiriAuy .13 aq psdQ a.iy no^ jj 



DONNEl MOORE SHOE COMPANY 

THE COLLEGE GIRL'S 
SHOE STORE 

OFFERS 
Footwear Novelties That Are Most Highly 
Favored By Smartly Dressed College Girls 



We French Dry-Clean 

And Dye 

All Classes of Garments 

Gloves, Plumes, Etc. 

At Reasonable Prices 



Parcels Post Orders Given 
Prompt Attention 



COLUMBIA 
LAUNDRY CO. 

12-114-116 Fayetteville Street 
Greensboro, N. C. 



CALL OR PHONE 
US YOUR WANTS 

You Will Be Pleased With Our 
Courtesy, Accuracy, Service 

Prompt Delivery Our Motto 

Ralph J. Sykes 
Drug Store 

350 South Elm Street 

Near Southern Depot 
Telephones 1923 and 1924 



ANSCORIZE YOUR SCHOOL DAYS 

KEEP A PICTURE RECORD WITH YOUR ANSCO CAMERA 

OF YOUR COLLEGE COMPANIONS AND 

EVENTS ABOUT THE CAMPUS 

One of Our Albums Filled With Such Pictures Will Be Doubly 
Appreciated in After Years 

We Carry a Complete Line of 

ANSCO CAMERAS AND SUPPLIES 

And Are Willing At All Times to Help You In Your 
EfForts For Better Results 

Let Us Develop and Print Your Pictures 

ODELL HARDWARE COMPANY 



You Are Always 
Welcome At The 
House of Frazier 

Schomacker, the White House 

Piano since Lincoln's time. Also 

Emerson, Lindeman & Sons and the 

artistic Frazier 



)onoras an 



dF 



razieroias 



This College Uses and Endorses 
Our Pianos 

Frazier Piano Co. 

1 1 3 Market St. 
Greensboro, N. C. 



BURTNER'S 

Fully Equipped to Supply Your 
Every Requirement In 

FURNITURE AND 
HOUSEHOLD GOODS 

SPECIALTIES 
McDougald Kitchen Cabinets, Prin- 
cess Ranges, Victor Bed Springs, 

Sealy Mattresses 

Shades Made to Order 
"Kirsch Extension Rods 

Burtner Furniture Co. 



BY COURTESY OF THE 



O. HENRY HOTEL 



Greensboro, N. C. 



WILLS BOOK AND 
STATIONERY CO. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

FINE STATIONERY 

MEMORY BOOKS 

And All Kinds of Fancy Goods 



MRS. I. F. WEST 
Millinery 

1 1 4 West Washington St. 
Greensboro, N. C. 



The Favorite for Twenty Years 

B & B Pure Cream Kisses are 

known by thousands as one of the 

purest and most delicious candies on 

the market. We manufacture B 6c 

B Kisses in Greensboro and they are 

sold in five states 

GATE CITY CANDY 

COMPANY 

Phone 375 331 S. Elm St. 

Greensboro, N. C. 



PEERLESS 
MATTRESS CO. 

Lexington, N. C. 

MANUFACTURERS 
ALL GRADES OF 

MATTRESSES 

BED SPRINGS 

PILLOWS, ETC. 



GUILFORD 
CAFE 



Caters to the Best Class Trade 




DINNER PARTIES A SPECIALTY 



Greensboro, North Carolina 



Cottrell & Leonard 

Albany, N. Y. 

•f? 

Makers of 

Caps, Gowns, Hoods 



We Supply 
Greensboro College for Women 
As Well As Hundreds of Others 



B. B. TATUM 

Transfer and 
Livery Stables 

Moving Vans, Trucks and 
City Drays 

Automobile and Horse-Drawn 
Vehicles for All Occasions 



W. P. REAVES, M.D. 
C. R. REAVES, M.D. 

Reaves Eye, Ear, Nose 

and Throat Infirmary 

1 1 7 W. Sycamore Street 

Greensboro, N. C. 



Engraved Invitations, Visiting 
Cards and Monogram Stationery. 

Loose Leaf Memo Books and 
Sheet for Same. Best Quality Box 
Stationery in quire or ream packages. 

JOS. J. 
STONE & CO. 

Office Equipment and Sup- 
plies, Printers, Engravers 
and Book Binders 

110-112 East Sycamore Street 
Greensboro, N. C. 



Lewis & Andrews 

Exclusive Millinery 

I Per Cent Off For College Girls 

108 W. Washington St. 

Greensboro, N. C. 



BY COURTESY OF THE 

MOTOR 
SERVICE CO. 

High Point, N. C. 



Students of Greensboro College For Women 
When In Greensboro You Used 



VAN LINDLEY'S 



FLOWERS 



When You Go Home Do Not Forgat 
That We Are As Near You As Your 
Telephone Or Your Telegraph Office 



VAN LINDLEY COMPANY 

FLORISTS 

Flowers That Please 

Greensboro, North Carolina 



Greensboro College 
For women 



The A-Grade Woman's College 



OF- 



The Methodist Conferences 
of North Carolina 

CHARTERED 1838 



Confers the Degrees of A.B. and B.S. in the Literary Departments, and 
B.M. in the Music Department 



In addition to regular classical course, special attention is 
called to the departments of Home Economics, Expression, 
Business, Art, Education, Sunday School Teacher Training, 
Piano Pedagogy, and to our complete School of Music. 



Fall Term Opens September 8, 1 920 

For Further Information Apply To 

Rev. S. B. Turrentine, A.M., D.D., President 

Greensboro, N. C. 



■a 



PICTURES 
FOR THIS BOOK 



MADE BY 




1548 Broadway 
NEW YORK CITY 



•E 



I i 



KENDALL" 



ENGRAVER AND 
PRINTER 

Calling Cards 
Programs 
Invitations 

Engraved and Printed 

2 1 6 North Elm Street 
Opposite O. Henry Hotel 



RUN RIGHT TO 

RING'S 

The Rexall Store 



DEPENDABLE 

No better thing can be said of 
any man or any business concern 
than that he or it is dependable. 
Your dependability rests largely 
upon your financial standing and 
methods. Right there is where this 
Bank can help you. 

WACHOVIA BANK 
& TRUST CO. 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 

Capital-Surplus 
$2,000,000.00 

Resources Over 
$31,000,000.00 



DIXIE SALES CO. 

1 1 5 West Market St. 
Greensboro, N. C. 

VULCANIZING AND 
TIRE SUPPLIES 

Pennsylvania Vacuum Cup Tires 
Goodyear and Goodrich Tires 



Founded in 1838 Chartered in 1859 

TRINITY COLLEGE 

Durham, N. C. 

A well-known old college, with handsome new buildings, a large, beau- 
tiful campus, first-class special and general equipment, and a nation-wide 
reputation for high standards and progressive policies. Fees and expenses 
are low. Classical and scientific courses leading to Bachelor's degrees. 
Graduate courses in all departments. Schools of Engineering, Education, 
and Law. 

For catalogue and illustrated booklet, address R. L. Flowers, Secretary 
to the Corporation. 



MOONSHINE 
KISSES 




MADE BY 



Ballance & Company 

Greensboro, N. C. 



BY COURTESY 



OF 



WOOD BROS. 



HIGH POINT 

N. C. 



F. B. 

Shackelford Co. 

Smart Apparel For 
Women and Misses 



We extend a cordial invitation to 
G. C. W. girls to make our store 
your headquarters. 

Accessories and ready-to-wear of 
the better kind. 

Ten per cent discount offered 
G. C. W. girls. 



The Store of Courteous Attention 



McARTHUR'S 



Women's Ready-to- Wear Coats, 
Suits, Street, Dinner and Evening 
Dresses, Tailored and Dressy 
Blouses, Hand-Embroidered and 
Silk Lingerie, Pettycoats, Hand- 
kerchiefs and Fashionette Hair Nets. 



O. P. McARTHUR 
& CO. 

212 South Elm Street 



A DAILY NEWSPAPER FOR THE HOME 



THE GREENSBORO DAILY NEWS 



is well equipped to handle all the news properly and quickly. This newspaper 
is served not only by the full Associated Press service, but maintains and 
operates a private leased wire to Washington, and has special articles of 
interest to women as well as to men. 

Special features include the David Lawrence articles, the C. W. Gilbert 
daily articles, the Washington Bureau reports, and a state news service that is 
unexcelled. 

Send a trial subscription for three or six months and be convinced that the 
Daily News is "Leading Them All in North Carolina." 



BY COURTESY 
of 



HART BROS. 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 



The 

Harrison Printing 

Company 

INCORPORATED 

Printers, Binders, Rulers 

Office Supplies 

C. G. Harrison, Pres. and Treas. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Huntley-Stockton-Hill Co- 

DEALERS IN 

EDISON 
PHONOGRAPHS 

AND 

FURNITURE 

Greensboro, N. C. 



Heckman 



BINDERY, INC. 
Bound-Tb-Please - 

JUNE 05 

N. MANCHESTER, INDIANA 46962